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  1. #1
    Platinum Member Platinum Member CigDaze's Avatar
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    Thumbs up Meaningless Dribble -- A Short History lesson...

    For the inquisitive ones, like myself, I thought this may be interesting!

    Have Fun Today!!!

    Unlike most of the other nonfoolish holidays, the history of April Fool's Day, sometimes called All Fool's Day, is not totally clear. There really wasn't a "first April Fool's Day" that can be pinpointed on the calendar. Some believe it sort of evolved simultaneously in several cultures at the same time, from celebrations involving the first day of spring.

    The closest point in time that can be identified as the beginning of this tradition was in 1582, in France. Prior to that year, the new year was celebrated for eight days, beginning on March 25. The celebration culminated on April 1. With the reform of the calendar under Charles IX, the Gregorian Calendar was introduced, and New Year's Day was moved to January 1.

    However, communications being what they were in the days when news traveled by foot, many people did not receive the news for several years. Others, the more obstinate crowd, refused to accept the new calendar and continued to celebrate the new year on April 1. These backward folk were labeled as "fools" by the general populace. They were subject to some ridicule, and were often sent on "fools errands" or were made the butt of other practical jokes.

    This harassment evolved, over time, into a tradition of prank-playing on the first day of April. The tradition eventually spread to England and Scotland in the eighteenth century. It was later introduced to the American colonies of both the English and French. April Fool's Day thus developed into an international fun fest, so to speak, with different nationalities specializing in their own brand of humor at the expense of their friends and families.

    In Scotland, for example, April Fool's Day is actually celebrated for two days. The second day is devoted to pranks involving the posterior region of the body. It is called Taily Day. The origin of the "kick me" sign can be traced to this observance.

    Mexico's counterpart of April Fool's Day is actually observed on December 28. Originally, the day was a sad remembrance of the slaughter of the innocent children by King Herod. It eventually evolved into a lighter commemoration involving pranks and trickery.

    Pranks performed on April Fool's Day range from the simple, (such as saying, "Your shoe's untied!), to the elaborate. Setting a roommate's alarm clock back an hour is a common gag. Whatever the prank, the trickster usually ends it by yelling to his victim, "April Fool!"

    Practical jokes are a common practice on April Fool's Day. Sometimes, elaborate practical jokes are played on friends or relatives that last the entire day. The news media even gets involved. For instance, a British short film once shown on April Fool's Day was a fairly detailed documentary about "spaghetti farmers" and how they harvest their crop from the spaghetti trees.

    April Fool's Day is a "for-fun-only" observance. Nobody is expected to buy gifts or to take their "significant other" out to eat in a fancy restaurant. Nobody gets off work or school. It's simply a fun little holiday, but a holiday on which one must remain forever vigilant, for he may be the next April Fool!


    France: The April Fool’s is called "April Fish" (Poisson d'Avril). The French fool their friends by taping a paper fish to their friends’ backs and when someone discovers this trick, they yell “Poisson d’Avril!”. (The fish in April are newly hatched and easily caught.)

    England: Tricks can be played only in the morning. If a trick is played on you, you are a "noodle".

    Scotland: April Fools Day is 48 hours long and you are called an "April Gowk", which is another name for a cuckoo bird. The second day in Scotland’s April Fool's is called Taily Day and is dedicated to pranks involving the buttocks. Taily Day's gift to posterior posterity is the still-hilarious "Kick Me" sign.

    Portugal: April Fool's is celebrated on the Sunday and Monday before Lent. The traditional trick there is to throw flour at your friends.

    United States: Americans play small tricks on friends and strangers alike on the first of April. One common trick, is pointing down to a friend's shoe and saying, "Your shoelace is untied."

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  2. #2
    Platinum Member Platinum Member CigDaze's Avatar
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    Let's liven this up a little!

    Let's here all your favorite pranks and tricks!...
    Anyone with good ones?

    I got a bunch of people here at work calling our IT Admin because their mouses were not working. A little scotch tape does wonders!

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