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Geico take out turbines?

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Old 11-22-2011, 03:55 AM
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My perspective on competitive racing and the forefront of technology...Miss G has amassed years of data which was afford them through hard work and dedication and $$$. The problem is, for other teams to become competitive from scratch is possible but unrealistic, unless they have long long resources(unlikely today). Naturally dedicated hardworking racers (MissG)extend their hands out to fellow racers who need help in the spirit of creating a competitive race field resulting in less than lack luster results . I seen this scenario before and numerous times the classes folded and org's also failed, due to lack of competition which drew less spectators thus less sponsors resulting in less $$$.

Is it fair to MissG team to share their data acquired with competitors bc teams dont have the money or the dedication and $$ to bridge the gap??? It seems MissG Team is going to have to package their turbine program into an affordable(can affordable and turbine coincide in the same sentence??) and maintainable package where they can through their Team's hard work create a competitive turbine class?

I dont expect them to hand out their privacy data so this is a possible option for them to be partially reimbursed for the $$ investment they made into the sport while ensuring the future of turbine racing.( No $$ can make up for their personal dedication just to be clear--thats whats makes people of a racing breed)

Although I dont know where offshore racing is headed, this could be the future for Team Yellow Boat Miss G.!! Noone in the right mind should expect them to to remove the turbines!
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Old 11-22-2011, 01:33 PM
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[QUOTE=Turbofan;3554603]I had a long article in response to post #32 above in this thread all written up and ready to post, when I discovered the letter of Miss G(#34). After reading it, I didnīt feel like talking about the difference between classical mechanics and fluid thermodynamics any more (and the AGT 1500 is especially complex, due to its preheater and its scroll combustion chamber.


http://www.honeywell.com/sites/aero/...165D399CBF.htm
This turbine has been in the Abrams US Army tank since 1976 and has proven to be very reliable. It isn't as much rocket science as you imply. High school graduates with Army training and tools maintain this turbine 24/7.
ed
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Old 11-22-2011, 11:42 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MissGeicoRacing View Post
Please dont go.
How could I refuse to comply if somebody like you asks me like that? I was surprised to read this, since I really thought that you had gotten angry with me. Nonetheless, I think that I should perhaps pipe down some and catch some more of that Kung-Fu spirit (Yip Man is too much honor for me) in order to not let a potentially usefull and/or constructive thread go up in flames. So thank you for your invitation, gentlemen. It certainly does make me feel honored.

Quote:
Originally Posted by kilrbusa View Post
It seems MissG Team is going to have to package their turbine program into an affordable(can affordable and turbine coincide in the same sentence??) and maintainable package where they can through their Team's hard work create a competitive turbine class?
I dont expect them to hand out their privacy data so this is a possible option for them to be partially reimbursed for the $$ investment they made into the sport while ensuring the future of turbine racing.
I donīt know if AMF would be able to provide an off the shelf package like you suggest. At any rate, under the present circumstances I rather feel that they would take an injustifiable business risk if they were to offer something like this, even if they were able to. Perhaps they could offer it in a more tentative manner, just in case they were asked to provide such a boat, but I really donīt feel competent to give any advice on this issue. Besides, as I read on this forum that they are more specialized in canopy upgrades, safety upgrades, race rigging, dial in etc.. By the way, the picture of their shop at http://www.offshoreonly.com/forums/a...shop_boats.jpg shows the MTI Miss Geico. Wonder if these boats were/are for sale or had been rigged (the photo had been posted in Feb. 2010).

But your post inspired me to think along the lines of a much less risky project, which could nevertheless mean lots of fun (and work):
The principal asset of Miss Geico Racing is their know how. And what better package is there for selling know how than - a book? So what I am thinking or phantasizing about is “The Guide to Turbine Offshore Racing” by M. Granet, S. Begovich, G. Stray, G. Goodell, J. Kapala and G. Slogar et al. –i.e. whoever is willing and deemed competent enough to contribute (and how about a foreword by John Arruda? It always looks good to invite someone else for that). It should contain a general introduction to the sport and its history, an overview of internal combustion engines and their characteristics with a special emphasis on gas turbines and their peculiarities, chapters on dos and donīts in building a race team, selecting equipment on the market, etc.. One of the most important chapters would of course be on how to find a sponsor. The book should contain many pretty photos and good drawings, and be able to transmit the necessary technical information without becoming dry. This might perhaps be achieved by spicing it with anecdotical tidbits. But most of all, it should transmit the excitement of offshore racing and awaken interest in technologically inclined people (thatīs where the turbines come in). So it might well also contain a purely anecdotical part at the end. Anything that helps to make it lively. And why should it not –at the end- mention the youth and the problems of the turbine class, and that it is a wide open field? At any rate, the authors should encourage the readers to get into contact with them in case they have any open questions.

Even though I am not an offshore racer, if such a book were well made, I would certainly count among its potential buyers. And perhaps someday somebody with the right stuff (money included) would find it in a marine bookstore...

So if the turbine class doesnīt exist, why not pretend it does?
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Old 11-24-2011, 01:23 AM
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But your post inspired me to think along the lines of a much less risky project, which could nevertheless mean lots of fun (and work):
The principal asset of Miss Geico Racing is their know how. And what better package is there for selling know how than - a book? So what I am thinking or phantasizing about is “The Guide to Turbine Offshore Racing” by M. Granet, S. Begovich, G. Stray, G. Goodell, J. Kapala and G. Slogar et al. –i.e. whoever is willing and deemed competent enough to contribute (and how about a foreword by John Arruda? It always looks good to invite someone else for that). It should contain a general introduction to the sport and its history, an overview of internal combustion engines and their characteristics with a special emphasis on gas turbines and their peculiarities, chapters on dos and donīts in building a race team, selecting equipment on the market, etc.. One of the most important chapters would of course be on how to find a sponsor. The book should contain many pretty photos and good drawings, and be able to transmit the necessary technical information without becoming dry. This might perhaps be achieved by spicing it with anecdotical tidbits. But most of all, it should transmit the excitement of offshore racing and awaken interest in technologically inclined people (thatīs where the turbines come in). So it might well also contain a purely anecdotical part at the end. Anything that helps to make it lively. And why should it not –at the end- mention the youth and the problems of the turbine class, and that it is a wide open field? At any rate, the authors should encourage the readers to get into contact with them in case they have any open questions.



Great idea!

(BTW turbofan I'm glad you decided to stick around. Turbines need all the good press they can get. Just don't expect JBS to go groveling to MGR; not gonna happen).

Last edited by Catmando; 11-24-2011 at 01:28 AM.
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Old 11-24-2011, 01:29 AM
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But your post inspired me to think along the lines of a much less risky project, which could nevertheless mean lots of fun (and work):
The principal asset of Miss Geico Racing is their know how. And what better package is there for selling know how than - a book? So what I am thinking or phantasizing about is “The Guide to Turbine Offshore Racing” by M. Granet, S. Begovich, G. Stray, G. Goodell, J. Kapala and G. Slogar et al. –i.e. whoever is willing and deemed competent enough to contribute (and how about a foreword by John Arruda? It always looks good to invite someone else for that). It should contain a general introduction to the sport and its history, an overview of internal combustion engines and their characteristics with a special emphasis on gas turbines and their peculiarities, chapters on dos and donīts in building a race team, selecting equipment on the market, etc.. One of the most important chapters would of course be on how to find a sponsor. The book should contain many pretty photos and good drawings, and be able to transmit the necessary technical information without becoming dry. This might perhaps be achieved by spicing it with anecdotical tidbits. But most of all, it should transmit the excitement of offshore racing and awaken interest in technologically inclined people (thatīs where the turbines come in). So it might well also contain a purely anecdotical part at the end. Anything that helps to make it lively. And why should it not –at the end- mention the youth and the problems of the turbine class, and that it is a wide open field? At any rate, the authors should encourage the readers to get into contact with them in case they have any open questions.



Great idea!

(BTW I'm glad you decided to stick around. Turbines need all the good press they can get. Just don't expect JBS to go groveling to MGR; not gonna happen).
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