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100000hp @ 102rpm

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Old 04-17-2013, 07:30 PM
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Default 100000hp @ 102rpm

http://www.vincelewis.net/bigengine.html

Awesome

"engine is paid off after first trip"
DAMN!!!
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Old 04-17-2013, 07:36 PM
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Why dont the connecting rods and mains have ball bearings?
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Old 04-17-2013, 08:07 PM
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That is something else, like the paid off statement also. There is no money in oil.
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Old 04-17-2013, 11:14 PM
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There is a guy in the tech section trying to install this in a 30 Scarab
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Old 04-18-2013, 07:25 AM
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Originally Posted by Keith Atlanta View Post
Why dont the connecting rods and mains have ball bearings?
The bearings of large engines are white metal. Lube oil is pumped in between the bearing surfaces and the film of oil is enough to keep the metal from touching. Rollers or ball bearings would be impractical.

Before starting the oil pressure is raised and if the engine has not started in a day or two it is turned over mechanically a few times first, like a pre-oiler. The engines are also kept hot even when not being run using the ship's small boiler so the jacket water is constantly at operating temperature.

The article is basically correct but there are a few mistakes. These engines do not burn crude oil for one thing. Crude is full of all sorts of garbage that would clog the injectors. Actually the crude would never make it that far, the purifiers would choke and fail first.

Ship engines burn bunker oil, or heavy fuel as we used to call it. Very thick black oil, thicker and blacker than oil out of a car with 10,000 miles on it. It is cheaper than crude. It has to have the water removed and be heated to over 200* before it will flow properly, including while it is in the bunker tanks where steam lines heat it. Allow it to cool and you can make roads out of it!

Also the pistons you see with the holes in them are called shakers, the holes are not shot with oil but water instead for cooling, why do you need to lubricate the inside of a piston????
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Old 04-18-2013, 10:13 AM
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I don't believe they make their money back on a brand new ship and engine in one trip. No way, if that was the case, everyone would be getting into the shipping business.

Also, I am blown away that it costs $2000 for a 20 foot boat to traverse the Panama Canal. That's insane!
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Old 04-18-2013, 11:18 AM
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Yea theres a lot of info thats not accurate in that read, but its till a pretty good read!

There are thousands of low speed diesels out there powering ships, but none as large as this one. Most of them run between 70 and 110 rpms.

Its really cool to see one of these engines in the engine room of a vessel. Even some of the smaller mid speed diesels are cool to see. 8 Cyl engines that redline at 800ish rpms and make 7000 plus hp!
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