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Laugh at Vee hulls huh? I blew by this big ole' Cat hull!!!

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Old 07-25-2002, 09:46 AM
  #11
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Damn, that thing is unreal...Cool-azz rig.
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Old 07-25-2002, 10:25 AM
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they built the originals in australia. the also use them to cross the english channel. they are bad ass. they use them to compete against the aging hovercrafts and hydrofoils.
 
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Old 07-25-2002, 11:14 AM
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Hey Nort, I'm betting he'd eat you up in BIG water - say 12-15 footers
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Old 07-25-2002, 11:27 AM
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OK Folks, I know what it is, where it came from and what it's purpose is. Problem is I can't tell the specifics. Here is what I can say. It is under evaluation by DOD, it carries a large payload, goes fast (Audiofn is close) and notice the hull design (very shallow draw), Punk Rocket's origin is pretty good intel. All I can say sorry........... In summary that is one large payload, fast ass, shallow drafting kick ass CAT.

And I have to agree with mxz800, I think he was only able to pass the big-girl while she was taxiing out of the harbor or going through pre-cruse warm-up and system tests.
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Old 07-25-2002, 11:27 AM
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That is an InCat 96 metre Wave Piercing Sealift Catamaran.............

Here is thier web address: http://www.incat.com.au


More Info here
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Old 07-25-2002, 12:34 PM
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The story as I remeber it was the Austrailian navy and the US navy were doing a combined operations, E. Temore?maybe, anyway, the ausies had leased this craft and it was doing deliveries at a rate 3-4 times as fast as the plodding us craft.

There was a huge write up I read on one of the DOD web pages. IT puts our current landing craft to shame, basically we still us WWII technology except for our hovercraft. This looks to be the next step for large landing craft.

Here is a link to the overall concept:

http://www.nwdc.navy.mil/HSV/ConceptHSV.asp

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Old 07-25-2002, 12:41 PM
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The Joint Venture HSV-X1 was leased by the Tank-Automotive and Armament Command. The U.S. military signed a charter contract with Bollinger/Incat USA, L.L.C. for more than $20,000,000, for up to two years. TACOM will use the vessel to demonstrate its ability to perform specific mission scenarios and limited operational experiments and to move troops, heavy military vehicles and equipment. The high-speed, wave-piercing sealift catamaran vessel, built and designed by Australian shipbuilders, underwent six weeks of technical and structural modifications to meet the military's requirements. Modifications included the building and installation of a helicopter pad suitable for large military helicopters such as the SH-60 Seahawk and the CH-46 Sea Knight. Incat also designed and constructed a two-part, hydraulically-operated vehicle ramp that allows rapid loading and discharge of vehicles from the stern or alongside it.

The joint-service experiment will be coordinated by the Navy Warfare Development Command in close partnership with elements of the Army, Navy, Marine Corps and Coast Guard. The Army's focus for experimentation is to validate and assess the vessel's capability for meeting the needs of Army Transformationd. Concepts that will be considered are simultaneous deployment and employment of the Objective Force; fight on arrival; en route mission planning and rehearsal; passengers and equipment moving together; bypassing strategic and operational chokepoints; and entry operations at multiple points. Capabilities to be tested include speed, high payload fraction, longer and more useful ranges and the ability to tailor the payload for optimum mission success.

The speed of the HSV can get troops into theatre quicker. The speed of the HSV is phenomenal compared to the speed of the LSV. The Joint Venture High Speed Vessel can do 35-40 knots. The Army's current Logistics Support Vessel only averages about 12 knots. Some of the differences between the Joint Venture HSV-X1 and the Logistic Support Vessel is the HSV has more electronics on board. Computers run most of the systems on the boat. The HSV has the ability to push troops and a crew into theatre about four times as fast as the LSV.

The Westpac Express is a hybrid (Roll-on/roll-off passenger ferry/Cargo freighter) vessel. The Westpac Express, which can travel at speeds of more than 40 knots, is 331 feet long and has two vehicle and cargo decks with a combined 33,000 square feet of storage space. The ship has no berthing for passengers. The ship is capable of transporting 970 Marines in airline style reclining seats on its upper deck. Along with the passengers, the Westpac Express can carry 305 ton of equipment. The vessel enables III MEF to rapidly transport a complete battalion of 950 marines together with up to 550 tons of vehicles and equipment, in one lift, with considerable strategic and cost advantages. WestPac Express is also fully truck capable and has a maximum deadweight of 750 tons. It has a 15 ton axle load and is capable of carrying ten 40 tonne trucks. Lane widths are 3.5 meters and the bow door allows for very quick loading and discharge times.

The ability to carry such high loads is a considerable savings in time and money when compared to using military and commercial aircraft. If III MEF were to use aircraft to move this same number of Marines and equipment it would require 14 to 17 military aircraft spread out over a 14- to 17-day period in and out of Kadena. Currently, III MEF relies heavily on Air Mobility Command strategic airlift support in order to transport Marines and equipment to training sites in the Asian-Pacific Region.

Over its years of use throughout the world, the HSV has proven to be a safe mode of transport. HSVs have been safely transiting waters all across the globe for more than 10 years. This is not a new technology or an experimental vessel. For example, the Royal Australian Navy was very successful at using a high-speed catamaran in real-world operations supporting the International Force East Timor mission.

The 101m “WestPac Express” is the largest of Austal’s Auto Express series of vehicle-passenger ferries and showcases the talent and diversity of the Western Australian shipyard. Austal’s Auto Express was the world’s first vehicle-passenger catamaran to be able to carry coaches/buses. In fact, efficient vehicle handling and superb interior outfits have set the Austal Auto Express apart from its competitors. The Auto Express 101 model, used in the Marine Corps demonstration, is a 101 meter long high speed vehicle-passenger catamaran with a capacity of 950 - 1200 passengers, 250 - 300 cars or 16 trucks & 96 cars, with a speed of 37 knots.

Based on Austal’s leading technology and high speed aluminium platforms, the company has developed a range of vessels to meet numerous amphibious and logistics transport requirements. Austal’s High Speed Sealift Ship designs or the TLV, Theatre Logistics Vessels, fulfill a niche requirement in the global military marketplace for inexpensive, flexible and commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) high-speed transport ships to bridge a capability gap between landing craft and large amphibious lift ships. The TLV features bow and stern loading ramps - the bow ramp for conventional port facilities whilst the rear articulated ramp design permits autonomous operations in shallow draft ports with austere or limited support facilities. A variety of propulsion systems can be configured to deliver service speeds in excess of 40 knots.

Austal developed the high speed Theatre Logistics Vessel to enhance the capability of military organisations to rapidly move large numbers of troops and cargo during military operations. The vessel has large bow and stern ramps enabling her to load and unload military vehicles in low infrastructure ports. With strengthened decks, internal hoistable ramps and mezzanine decks the vessel can carry a wide mix of military vehicles. In addition to the custom design of the vessel to suit military application, a unique Austal design innovation is featured in the garage. The hoistable vehicle deck features 1190 lane metres including 341 freight lane metres and can facilitate a mix of vehicle and commercial/freight carriage. The hoistable deck (full length of the vessel) has four hydraulically operated sections that can be operated together or independently and can be raised or lowered in less than one minute.

Okinawa-based Marines will continue using the high-speed WestPac Express ferry for another three years. After what Marine officers called the "overwhelming success" of a six-month trial run, the Military Sealift Command awarded Austal Ships Ltd. an initial $31 million lease for the 331-foot long catamaran. According to the contract announcement, the ship will be based at Okinawa for use by the 3rd Marine Expeditionary Force. The ship will sail under Panamanian registry for the first year, then be reflagged under U.S. registry when Austal establishes a U.S. subsidiary in Alabama.

WestPac Express has transported nearly every piece of equipment in the Marine Corps inventory, excluding fixed wing aircraft, CH-53E helicopters and M1-A1 tanks. During the trial period, the HSV also transported civilian fire trucks, in an effort to test the Marine Corps ability to respond to potential requests for humanitarian assistance or disaster relief.

The WestPac Express, which is owned and operated by Austal Ships Ltd. of Australia, was thoroughly tested and evaluated during an exhaustive trial period that lasted 238 days, from last June to early February. The HSV is a high speed, hybrid (roll-on/roll-off passenger ferry/cargo freighter) vessel, which is well suited for III MEF training exercises. During the trial period, the vessel transported more than 10,000 Marines and more than 15.4 million pounds of cargo from Okinawa to destinations such as mainland Japan, Korea and Guam.

The HSV can move nearly 1,000 Marines and 300 tons of equipment in a single load. If III MEF were to use aircraft to move this same number of Marines and equipment it would require 14 to 17 military aircraft spread out over a 14 to 17 day period. The WestPac Express' impact on III MEF operations has reduced in-transit days plus permitted more equipment and personnel be transported as a complete unit.

III MEF's use of the HSV also resulted in a sizable reduction in aircraft flights in and out of Kadena Air Base, which has greatly reduced noise impact on the surrounding communities. The amount of cargo and personnel transported during the trial period was equivalent to 276 C-17 cargo plane flights. Another significant benefit has been a decrease in road travel by military trucks and buses in the more congested southern portion of Okinawa near Naha. Convoys of Marine Corps personnel and equipment from Camp Schwab and Camp Hansen to Kadena AB and Naha Military Port were a common evolution and now have been reduced significantly thus reducing the impact on both Naha traffic and surrounding neighborhoods.
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Old 07-25-2002, 12:43 PM
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I like this part..........

“This ship does not like to go slow,” Miller said earlier, while showing interior portions of the aluminum hull that makes it both light and durable while enabling it to go fast. He said the vessel's four diesel-powered Caterpillar engines and four water jets operate more effectively at high speeds, which Beierl and his subordinates are allowing the ship to reach. Not only can the ship attain high speeds quickly -- in a matter of three to five minutes -- it can slow from 45 knots to a full stop in only three ship lengths, Miller said."


My boat won't stop in 3 boat lengths from 45 knots!!!!!!!!!!!!!
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Old 07-25-2002, 12:50 PM
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Default Ummmm, Nort.....

Actually it will stop that fast. See the post about hooking.
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Old 07-25-2002, 01:54 PM
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Default Re: Ummmm, Nort.....

Quote:
Originally posted by C_Spray
Actually it will stop that fast. See the post about hooking.

Chuck~

I stopped hooking just last year. It was a bad thing and really brought me down.

Seriously, that hooking thread is interesting.....I'm glad Eric added something there, except I'm wondering what mystery item #4 he left off. That one could be the whole key!!!
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