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Any one in dock building business? Or even just familiar with them......?

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Old 06-08-2016, 01:55 PM
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Old 06-08-2016, 03:38 PM
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4' wide is plenty stable if you have a single pile at the end. My whole marina is 32'x4' fingers
That's what I was thinking. I'll try to get that approved. Thanks for the info......
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Old 06-09-2016, 02:54 PM
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As for dock length, if you don't have to worry about wave action or boat wakes, I routinely stern my 382 into a dock that's only 18' long. Cross tie the stern, and it's no problem. I assume it's out of the question, but can you drive a pile in further off the end of the dock to tie the boat too?
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Old 06-09-2016, 04:52 PM
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Is this a permanent dock or seasonal that needs to be removed annually?
4x30 can be stable but there are variables you need to consider which revolve around bracing for stability.
If it is totally floating, then you are only as strong as your anchoring system. Traditional blocks or helical screws.
If it is a pipe dock, the typical dock has the water getting deeper the further away from shore. The longer pipes on the end will make the dock want to sway back and forth based on wave action. Again, anchoring systems to fasten this can help. If you have the ability to throw a piling into the mix, that changes everything in your favor to provide a more stable dock. The piling in that case is your anchoring system. Water depths play a significant factor in all this.
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Old 06-09-2016, 04:59 PM
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Be careful if you have to deal the Army corp of Engineers, permit sign-off wise
I know a guy going through he11 with the ACoE right now. Bought a house for 2.5 million, wood truss seawall needs to be replaced and he put in for an ACoE permit. They reviewed and said they will issue the permit as soon as he tears down everything behind the front door to the seawall (basically teardown the 15 yr old house). House was built too close to the water, city passed it but they don't agree and 15 years after it was built they now realize it doesn't meet their standards. He even got a a demolition order from them (red sticker on the front door). Needless to say 5 years later he is still fighting with them and living in the house (for now).
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Old 06-09-2016, 06:17 PM
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I know a guy going through he11 with the ACoE right now. Bought a house for 2.5 million, wood truss seawall needs to be replaced and he put in for an ACoE permit. They reviewed and said they will issue the permit as soon as he tears down everything behind the front door to the seawall (basically teardown the 15 yr old house). House was built too close to the water, city passed it but they don't agree and 15 years after it was built they now realize it doesn't meet their standards. He even got a a demolition order from them (red sticker on the front door). Needless to say 5 years later he is still fighting with them and living in the house (for now).
It's just crazy isn't it! We're getting ready to replace both our seawalls/docks, and I'm NOT EXPANDING ANYTHING, just to make sure I can get my permits. But then again, both of our lifts are already 10,000 lbs lifts. I'm going to put the 25 Talon on one at my mother-in-laws place, and the 388 on ours. I'm going to ask the dock contractors about adding a single pylon jet-ski lift for a little jet boat for my girls, we'll see what they saw about the possible permit issues with that....
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Old 06-10-2016, 05:56 AM
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WOW.....they sure make it fun....... thanks for the tips guys. I'll be going over details with my consultant soon. Hopefully I'll be allowed a pile or two, then that would make a 4'x30' work well. It's a canal with no wave action....... I'll keep you guys posted, thanks again......
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Old 06-10-2016, 06:51 AM
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Contract a reputable Engineer/Engineering Firm who are local to where your project is. Not sure the process in N.Y. but here in Mass the dock has to be approved locally by the town before any of the Fed and State agencies will even look at it. Having a local Engineer that the various boards are familiar with always helps.
As far as 4' width, that is what my current floating dock is and it's very stable. I have the black plastic tubs for flotation under 8' sections. The key to stability is to join the sections so there is no play between the two. I have two eyebolts at the ends of each section, the previous owner had shackles joining the two, I replaced them with 4' sections of pipe thru all four eyebolts and end caps so they can't walk out. The side to side stability is night and day.
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Old 06-10-2016, 06:58 AM
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Originally Posted by Dean Ferry View Post
It's just crazy isn't it! We're getting ready to replace both our seawalls/docks, and I'm NOT EXPANDING ANYTHING, just to make sure I can get my permits. But then again, both of our lifts are already 10,000 lbs lifts. I'm going to put the 25 Talon on one at my mother-in-laws place, and the 388 on ours. I'm going to ask the dock contractors about adding a single pylon jet-ski lift for a little jet boat for my girls, we'll see what they saw about the possible permit issues with that....
Dean can you use one of the swing away lifts? Those don't count in your over water coverage limits because you can swing it back over your dock.

That's the theory anyway. We had to shorten my dock and make the outer walkway narrow to pass.
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