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Cold weather fiber-glassing ?

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Old 11-21-2003, 09:16 PM
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Default Cold weather fiber-glassing ?

My question is how cold can the air temperature before you have curing problems ? above 48 ?

Answer is ?

Thank you Hugh
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Old 11-21-2003, 10:37 PM
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The colder it is the longer it will take to set up. I was told 60 deg was a minimum. I think the main problem is the set time when cold.
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Old 11-22-2003, 08:45 AM
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That redefines the term "cold molded"
I have worked with glass in cold temperatures and it just doesn't work. While it takes longer to set up as it produces heat to set it does not adhere very well. Best to have temps above 60-65 or be able to heat the repair area for a period of time prior to repair
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Old 11-22-2003, 10:29 AM
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thunder might be able to spend some light on this.. but i think you can get one of those really hot lights and point it right at the spot that you want to repair..
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Old 11-22-2003, 09:18 PM
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Yup keep the resin inside and then heat the area up with a shop light or those hallogen job site lights. Not to hot. Just enough to get it up to say 70 degrees. You want the heat to be the entire area not just getting the surface hot. Then once the area is repaired make sure you keep the light on it to keep it warm and you should be fine

Jon
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Old 11-22-2003, 09:30 PM
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Quote:
Originally posted by Audiofn
Yup keep the resin inside and then heat the area up with a shop light or those hallogen job site lights. Not to hot. Just enough to get it up to say 70 degrees. You want the heat to be the entire area not just getting the surface hot. Then once the area is repaired make sure you keep the light on it to keep it warm and you should be fine

Jon
Ive done that...And to save energy, kept the garage door closed. When you stand up you really notice it.
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Old 11-22-2003, 10:44 PM
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Thanks guys,

The boat a little large for the garage and the repair is quite large it's the whole deck being re-constructed.

VOF
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