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aluminum boats and leasing

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Old 03-17-2004, 03:18 PM
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Default aluminum boats and leasing

Can someone please begin some pros and cons on aluminum offshore boats? SOme of the problems I have heard are vibration problems and rivets breakuing loose. But that does not speak to welded aluminum. Any thoughts? I guess you cant blueprint an aluminum hull, but they seem to have performed quite well in the past. My thoughts are that it would serve to diminish depreciation and might even help ot serve a leasing market in the future. Then the only thing to be worked out is the engine.
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Old 03-18-2004, 01:07 PM
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Come on, any thoughts?
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Old 03-18-2004, 01:56 PM
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rtaylor The reason for rivets is because the sheet aluminum is to thin to weld. Mostly on the sides and deck. not a problem on the bottom. To build a large hull is very labor intensive, cost would be prohibitive Probably one could a hy tech composite hull cheaper
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Old 03-18-2004, 02:13 PM
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Something else that needs to be pointed out is no two aluminum boats are the same. They are all slightly different, unlike the molded boats that are built today.

Also, ever notice the electrolysis on your drives? What do you think happens to an aluminum boat???
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Old 03-18-2004, 11:00 PM
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One of the probs with aluminum is developing the necessary three dimensional curves for good hydrodynamics. Some mass production facilities for canoes and airplane wings have developed the stretch forming techniques to attain true 3D surfaces.
I like the alum idea, but noise and corrosion are a prob.
Generally an aluminum boat is lighter, but does not have the good aerodynamics for speed.
That outfit in Canada has a technique for building laminated aluminum hulls but I haven't seen much of it lately.
I don't believe that welding thin aluminum is the big issue so much as changing the temper at the weldment.
Remember, that most big airliners are rivited aluminum. These planes flex and I don't know if they have scheduled life expectancies on the rivets, but the boat hull takes impact loading that an airplane doesn't encounter. Well, maybe only once.
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Old 03-19-2004, 08:52 AM
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Then were the Cougars (Popeye) just so expensive that it is cost prohibitive on a more production level? Im thinking that this would be the key to leasing. Good point, though, that no two are exactly alike.
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