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CDL requirements.

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Old 10-27-2018, 08:55 PM
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Default CDL requirements.

Thinking of purchasing a f650 or a sportchassis to pull a 52 outerlimits. I have a regular class D Massachusetts license. With the truck and trailer it puts you way over the 26001lbs gvw that we can pull. Does any know how to get around this? Does not for hire work?

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Old 10-27-2018, 09:23 PM
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I know a lot of people will disagree but the only solution I could find for legal interstate towing of more than 26,001lbs and/or a trailer in excess of 10,000lbs was to obtain a class A CDL license. Unless you register your trailer and truck with RV plates, but that's going to be a hard sell. The alternative is having your rig impounded, a big fine and potential arrest. Since you are "not for hire" you wouldn't need to acquire and display a DOT number on your truck, but you still need a drivers license and plates that covers the weight of your rig.

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Old 10-27-2018, 10:50 PM
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Jason.
You WILL NOT need a CDL endorsement on your license if this is your own personal truck and trailer. Truck weight is irrelevant. But if your trailer only weighs over 10K lbs. then legally you would need to get an class "A" license. There is another option and that is to get a "Modified A" license. That allows you to pull a trailer that weighs up to 26K lbs. As long as your total weight on 5 axles is less than 80K your good. A CDL is only required if you drive commercially or for hire. I have driven for a living for 50 yrs. so I know all the rules. Even if you tag your tow vehicle as an RV that doesn't change the trailer weight. Again since you are not using your truck and trailer commercially, you don't need a CDL endorsement. I hope this clears up your concerns. Good luck.
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Old 10-28-2018, 07:18 AM
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I might add that I would think u would need a medical card. I would agree no need for a CDL but I think u still need to carry a medical card because of the weight.
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Old 10-28-2018, 08:34 AM
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Originally Posted by gofastboater View Post
Jason.
You WILL NOT need a CDL endorsement on your license if this is your own personal truck and trailer. Truck weight is irrelevant. But if your trailer only weighs over 10K lbs. then legally you would need to get an class "A" license. There is another option and that is to get a "Modified A" license. That allows you to pull a trailer that weighs up to 26K lbs. As long as your total weight on 5 axles is less than 80K your good. A CDL is only required if you drive commercially or for hire. I have driven for a living for 50 yrs. so I know all the rules. Even if you tag your tow vehicle as an RV that doesn't change the trailer weight. Again since you are not using your truck and trailer commercially, you don't need a CDL endorsement. I hope this clears up your concerns. Good luck.

Just talking out loud here but if that 10k trailer weight means you need a "modified" license than 75% of this site is in violation. I've never really looked into this, but am curious.....
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Old 10-28-2018, 08:45 AM
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I’m not sure what is entailed to get a CDL but you know the old saying: Better safe than sorry. Also different rules in different states most likely.
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Old 10-28-2018, 10:33 AM
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I went ahead and got my CDL when you could grandfather in with just the paper test even though as a farmer I'm exempt. I figured if I'm driving a semi daily it would be a good idea and it's likely only a matter of time before they remove the ag exemption and I would have to do the full test. As I understand the rules you can get out of having a cdl but if your combination weighs over 10,000 you need a medical card. Yes I realize that's basically everyone here but as you get bigger you might find they want to enforce that one.
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Old 10-28-2018, 10:35 AM
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seafordguy, you are correct in your assumption. I would say closer to 100%. Guys that have enclosed race car trailers are also effected, by law. Here's the thing. The DOT cops are only concerned with COMMERCIAL vehicles. Ones with DOT issued numbers. They will "target" landscapers, construction cos etc. Their open tandem axle trailers are normally overloaded. Not to mention that they are also checking for the proper papers. Again commercial. The "regular" cops are not fully versed in all of the DOT regulations. The DOT cops are the only ones that carry a set of scales to weigh you. Scales are the ONLY way to know what your rig weighs.
Boatfreak, you are NOT required to have a medical card if you don't have a CDL endorsement. Without the CDL, the DOT won't even look at you.
Sonicss42, DOT regulations are the same in every state. Getting your CDL entails taking the commercial drivers test. Written and driving in the size truck of the class you are seeking. If you are looking to get an class A license then you would need a tractor trailer rig to get that class license.
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Old 10-28-2018, 10:48 AM
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In KY, and did discuss this issue with local DOT

Ag only provides an exemption between personal farm properties and farm property and places to do farm business. The exemption is for farm equipment.

For personnel use you can get a 26000 plate for over $100.00 or 38000 KY Horse counsel plate for $20.00
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Old 10-28-2018, 11:21 AM
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Originally Posted by sonicss42 View Post
Im not sure what is entailed to get a CDL but you know the old saying: Better safe than sorry. Also different rules in different states most likely.
Getting a CDL is not difficult, there are plenty of practice tests online and the driving test isn't hard at all.

As of 1986 the CDL requirements are federal laws and determined by the DOT and apply to all states. The exact training program to obtain a CDL is determined by the state itself but the weight classifications are federal. Some states issue "modified" class licenses that are state-specific and may not allow you travel outside of the issuing state. In Illinois at least, a standard Class D drivers licenses has a maximum GVWR of 16,000lbs, as stated on the backside of the licenses. I think most states have similar ratings for a Class D license.

The DOT requirements for interstate travel while towing in excess of 10,000lbs or having a GVWR of more then 26,001lbs have absolutely nothing to do with being commercial or having a DOT number. The few exemptions are farm equipment, firefighting vehicles, military equipment and RVs.

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