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Shore power, battery tender, galvanic corrosion?

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Shore power, battery tender, galvanic corrosion?

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Old 01-28-2014, 10:31 AM
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Default Shore power, battery tender, galvanic corrosion?

I just bought a 1990 fountain 36 fever (38), i have a dock space that is equipped with shore power but i have no shore power hook up on my boat (only the dryer outlet/battery jumper under the seat)

Basically i want to know if this set up will be OK or if there are any other price comparable options .......

i planned to get a 120v converter and plug in my 120v battery maintainer (2 prong 1.5 amps) and connect it to my batteries. I just need a safe way to keep my batteries full after long days of playing music and being out on the water.

Also with this set up shore i be concerned with the galvanic corrosion? I didn't think i would need to get a galvanic isolator becasue i will only have "positive" and "neg" terminals hooked up from my 1.5 amp battery tender..... No ground wrie.


Should i still invest and or replace (does my boat have them already?) be concerned with the sacrificial anodes?

Thanks for the help. Also any suggestions on a fairly priced 220v -120v converter from shore power?
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Old 01-30-2014, 12:11 AM
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I can't think of any issues to be concerned about with a simple 12 volt setup. On larger boats with multiple 220vac or 110vac power leads you have polarity issues to watch out for and issues of leaking voltage into the water thru generator grounding plates. I know that will cause corrosion cause I've been shocked or felt the electricity in the water a few times over the years from bad grounds or reversed polarity feeding voltage into the hull. In your case, not an issue...

Since your only converting to 110vac to 12vdc nothing comes to mind to beware of, unless I'm missing something, then someone else can please add to that..

On the 220v to 110v AC converter, you should check with the dock master to be certain what type connections they use. Several possible options, and without seeing it I can only guess. If it is actually a 50A 220v connection, ya just need someone to make up a short cable that takes 1-leg off that 50a 220v plug, the neutral, and the ground, then on the other end a standard 3-prong 110v female plug and your set. Can possibly find one at a local marine parts store on the shelf, or the parts to make it yourself.

Basically all 4 wire 220vac marine plugs are, two separate legs of 110vac, plus a neutral leg, and a grounded leg, which the N and G are typically connected to the same grounding bar back at the breaker box anyways. But for starters you gotta be certain what's actually on the dock, 50a 220v or 30a 110v connections are most common. Here is another discussion on a sailing forum about it that might help sort you out better.

http://www.cruisersforum.com/forums/...ice-83618.html

Hope that helps.

Last edited by kidturbo; 01-30-2014 at 12:33 AM.
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Old 01-30-2014, 07:15 AM
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Thank you Kidturbo!.

Once the dock opens i'll give them a call and see what their connection is, 110 vs 220.
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