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What was the first stepped V-Bottom??

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Old 11-01-2005, 09:03 AM
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Default What was the first stepped V-Bottom??

I was playing around on boattrader yesterday and saw a 1998 38 Scarab AVS that had a twin step. I didn't think they started "really" stepping V-bottoms until 1999 or 2000. Was the scarab the first stepped V-bottom?? I've also seen some early fountains with steps, what year did that start? And how come some of the 2000 Top Guns are stepped and others are not? And I think I've seen a 1999 stepped top gun with Lucky Strikes paint job that was stepped. There is a 37 OL Stiletto at my marina with a very small single step, sort of like the 1998/1999 hustler slingshots. Just some questions I was curious about and figured you guys would know.
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Old 11-01-2005, 09:18 AM
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Default Re: What was the first stepped V-Bottom??

I believe the first Fountain's that were stepped came out in late '94???? I know all the '95's and above were stepped!!!!!
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Old 11-01-2005, 09:19 AM
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Default Re: What was the first stepped V-Bottom??

Wow, I thought Reggie Fountain invented the deep vee, steps, and hair plugs. Guess I was wrong.
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Old 11-01-2005, 09:24 AM
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Default Re: What was the first stepped V-Bottom??

Obsession has one in the early 90's, I doubt that was first....S. Stepp had to have his hand in there somewhere...
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Old 11-01-2005, 09:26 AM
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Default Re: What was the first stepped V-Bottom??

Hustler had a stepped 40 in 1989. You could get it with big power and Arnesons too.
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Old 11-01-2005, 09:30 AM
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Default Re: What was the first stepped V-Bottom??

T2x knows....

Quote:
Originally Posted by T2x
1959 Ray Hunt designs Bertram 31 "moppie" First V step hull (Step refers to longitudinal strakes) Boat immediately wins Miami Nassau race by a huge margin and establishes deep vees as the rough water planing design of choice, combining strength and performance.

1962 Don Aronow creates Formula 233 (copies Bertram with sexier lines) Hailed as a "break through". This makes offshore racing available to more people.

1964 Don Aronow creates Donzi (copies Formula with sexier lines)Hailed as a "break through".

1965 Paul Allison creates the "pad bottom" , first change in Ray Hunt's design that actually meant anything.

1966 Don Aronow creates Magnum (copies Donzi with sexier.etc, Throws a Schultz tunnel hull in for some obscure reason)

1969 Don Aronow creates Cigarette (copies Magnum without the Schultz Hydrokat)

1970 Don Aronow hires John Crouse as PR guy and is immediately Canonized as the second coming of Thomas Edison and Albert Einstein with a little Paul Bunyan thrown in for good measure.

1976 George Linder creates Challenger 21 arguably the greatest Vee bottom ever.

1981 Don Aronow creates The Squadron ( just a copy of Cigarette)

1981 Reggie Fountain aftermarkets Excaliburs, calls them Executioners and becomes the inventor of the Vee bottom....takes out pages of advertizing, and people actually believe him.

1981 Shadow puts a step on the revamped Challenger 21 and creates the world's first production stepped V bottom...admitting that the idea came from 1930's era runabouts and Sea plane floats.... Design is immediately discarded because there is no speed increase and the boat turns dangerously.

1982 Don Aronow creates the Apache 41 (Never gets a good night's sleep again).

1986 Don Aronow creates the "Blue Thunder" and a few years later is found dead of a gun shot wound. Early rumors that irate Blue Thunder owners killed him are squashed when Ben Kramer is implicated(irate Company owner).

1987. Hustler buys old Signature molds and creates new old Signatures.

1988 Fountain Powerboats creates the world's first ugly hook nosed bow and calls it an original "design change"..... and people believe him.

1993 Reggie Fountain invents the "stepped Vee"...again.......claims it's much faster .... and people believe him.

19931/2 Every other Vee bottom manufacturer invents the stepped Vee bottom ...again...
all of them are no faster than older models, but turn worse.

1996 Now that steps are considered State-of -the-Art, manufacturers turn to styling and graphics to jack up prices. Except Reggie who just charges a lot anyway...and people believe him.

1997 Mike Allweiss invents Factory class racing (or maybe it was Gene Whipp), believing that the public wants to watch 37 year old technology with sea plane bottom modifications flailing around in semi hysterical bedlam. This is considered "The Next Great Motorsport". Jersey Speed Skiff racers immediately protest, citing that they have had an exclusive on bizarre racing with antique designs for years.

1998 Manufacturers rise to the challenge and reduce weights in "competition" models to the point where they are useless in both rough and calm water.

1998 Pleasure boaters adopt all of this crap and put it to use in Poker Runs.....

2001. 38' Whiz bang barrel rolls in Atlantic City injuring passenger. Boat has Vee bottom with Steps. Other people report similar mishaps all over the U. S. (World?).

2001 Ray Hunt spins in his grave.

From http://www.offshoreonly.com/forums/s...ad.php?t=12464
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Old 11-01-2005, 10:18 AM
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Default Re: What was the first stepped V-Bottom??

You guys know nothing.... Stepped Hulls

The concept was originally proposed by Rev. Ramus of Sussex England in 1872. He proposed both a single step with tandem planing surfaces, and a combination of three pontoons with one forward and two aft. Indications are that these shapes were derived from model tests. Unfortunately, the heavy steam power plants of that day could not push a hull fast enough to plane, and take advantage of the new concept.

As early as 1906 there were published drawings for small stepped hulls with hard chines. William Henry Fauber [8] obtained a U.S. patent for hulls with multiple steps in 1908, but could find few people in the U.S.A. interested, so he moved to Europe.

Two small boats Solair (12') and Flapper (15') demonstrated the potential of stepped hulls as did the Harmsworth challenger Pioneer (5 steps) in 1910. (See Data Chart, Figure 12.)

The stepped hull began practical development about at the same time as the hard chined planing hull. A step in the bottom of a hull, raises part of the bottom surface so that it is no longer touching the water. Less wetted area. At the same time, the planing surfaces meet the water at a near optimum angle of attack over a wide range of speeds. The stepped hull is very efficient hydrodynamicly.

In the early days of stepped hulls, it was not certain just how many steps should be incorporated. Pioneer had 5 steps in 1910. Maple Leaf IV had 5 steps.

Maple Leaf IV: Length 39'-11" x Beam 8' . Two V-8 engines 350 Hp. each.

In 1912, Maple Leaf IV came over, from England, won the Harmsworth Trophy, and took it home. She had no less than five steps, and the driver sat on a pedestal high above the transom in order to see over the bow.

Some hulls had so many steps that they were called "shingled'. Rainbow IV (12 steps);

Eventually, model tests showed that a single step would be most efficient if you could locate it in the right position and give.it the proper depth.

The lines shown in Figure 10 are typical of stepped hulls in the 1920's. Note the very flat bottom. This boat raced in a class limited to engines with 1.5 litre displacements.

Gar wood brought the Harmsworth Trophy back to United States in 1920 with the first of his Miss America's. These single stepped craft so dominated the Gold Cup and Harmsworth racing that few other boats attempted to compete. The Miss America series were not really efficient boats, just big boats with huge amounts of power from multiple V-12 Packard engines.

Between about 1915 and 1940, a great many motor torpedo boats and fast patrol boats were built world wide, with stepped hulls. [10] The performance of these craft varied considerably, with some being very inefficient.

Stepped Hull Limitations

The stepped hull maintains a nearly optimum angle of attack over most of the speed range. The hydrodynamic hull drag is almost constant. The drag of the propeller shaft, shaft strut and rudder, (appendage drag) increase as the square of the speed.

The graph of Performance Factors shows actual speed data of different prominent racing stepped hulls. The data points are numbered and refer to numbers on the data chart Figure 12. The boats are numbered in sequence according to the year when the speeds were established. The sequential increases in power factor reflect engine development and not hull development. Notice that most of these boats perform almost on the limit line. Gar Wood's Miss Americas were really quite inefficient. Many stepped hulls from England were significantly more efficient and often faster. They failed to win races because of a lack of strength and mechanical reliability. The very streamlined Alagi was slightly more efficient than the others.

Stepped hulls are difficult to design. There are many design variables compared to the design of a Vee bottomed monohull. I do not know of any accurate method available to optimize stepped hull design other than by model testing.

Stepped hulls dominated race boat design until about 1938 when Adolph Apel patented the three point hydroplane configuration. Ventnor three point hydroplanes dominated small limited class racing, yet stepped hulls were running competitively in Unlimited class racing up until 1949. In 1950, Slo-Mo-Shun demonstrated 'prop riding' and boosted the world speed record significantly. (More on 'prop riding" later.)

Stepped hulls definitely have the potential of being significantly more efficient than rnonohulls.

Compare the Limit Lines on the Performance Factor graphs. There are a number of reasons why stepped hulls did not become popular for pleasure boats.

(a) Complexity of design, and the costs of development.

(b) Stepped hulls were banned from gold cup racing from 1920 to 1931. Wealthy race boat owners were not investing in stepped hull development.

(c) There were quite a few relatively small stepped 'gentleman's racers' built, but few of these were really efficient.

(d) There were many huge war-surplus aircraft engines available after the first world war, at reasonable prices, and few light weight marine engines available. It was easier, (and possibly cheaper) to buy a big engine for a monohull, than to develop an efficient stepped hull.

OSO....You have been schooled

Last edited by Back4More; 11-01-2005 at 10:27 AM.
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Old 11-01-2005, 11:15 AM
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Default Re: What was the first stepped V-Bottom??

Quote:
Originally Posted by Back4More
You guys know nothing.... Stepped Hulls

The concept was originally proposed by Rev. Ramus of Sussex England in 1872. He proposed both a single step with tandem planing surfaces, and a combination of three pontoons with one forward and two aft. Indications are that these shapes were derived from model tests. Unfortunately, the heavy steam power plants of that day could not push a hull fast enough to plane, and take advantage of the new concept.

As early as 1906 there were published drawings for small stepped hulls with hard chines. William Henry Fauber [8] obtained a U.S. patent for hulls with multiple steps in 1908, but could find few people in the U.S.A. interested, so he moved to Europe.

Two small boats Solair (12') and Flapper (15') demonstrated the potential of stepped hulls as did the Harmsworth challenger Pioneer (5 steps) in 1910. (See Data Chart, Figure 12.)

The stepped hull began practical development about at the same time as the hard chined planing hull. A step in the bottom of a hull, raises part of the bottom surface so that it is no longer touching the water. Less wetted area. At the same time, the planing surfaces meet the water at a near optimum angle of attack over a wide range of speeds. The stepped hull is very efficient hydrodynamicly.

In the early days of stepped hulls, it was not certain just how many steps should be incorporated. Pioneer had 5 steps in 1910. Maple Leaf IV had 5 steps.

Maple Leaf IV: Length 39'-11" x Beam 8' . Two V-8 engines 350 Hp. each.

In 1912, Maple Leaf IV came over, from England, won the Harmsworth Trophy, and took it home. She had no less than five steps, and the driver sat on a pedestal high above the transom in order to see over the bow.

Some hulls had so many steps that they were called "shingled'. Rainbow IV (12 steps);

Eventually, model tests showed that a single step would be most efficient if you could locate it in the right position and give.it the proper depth.

The lines shown in Figure 10 are typical of stepped hulls in the 1920's. Note the very flat bottom. This boat raced in a class limited to engines with 1.5 litre displacements.

Gar wood brought the Harmsworth Trophy back to United States in 1920 with the first of his Miss America's. These single stepped craft so dominated the Gold Cup and Harmsworth racing that few other boats attempted to compete. The Miss America series were not really efficient boats, just big boats with huge amounts of power from multiple V-12 Packard engines.

Between about 1915 and 1940, a great many motor torpedo boats and fast patrol boats were built world wide, with stepped hulls. [10] The performance of these craft varied considerably, with some being very inefficient.

Stepped Hull Limitations

The stepped hull maintains a nearly optimum angle of attack over most of the speed range. The hydrodynamic hull drag is almost constant. The drag of the propeller shaft, shaft strut and rudder, (appendage drag) increase as the square of the speed.

The graph of Performance Factors shows actual speed data of different prominent racing stepped hulls. The data points are numbered and refer to numbers on the data chart Figure 12. The boats are numbered in sequence according to the year when the speeds were established. The sequential increases in power factor reflect engine development and not hull development. Notice that most of these boats perform almost on the limit line. Gar Wood's Miss Americas were really quite inefficient. Many stepped hulls from England were significantly more efficient and often faster. They failed to win races because of a lack of strength and mechanical reliability. The very streamlined Alagi was slightly more efficient than the others.

Stepped hulls are difficult to design. There are many design variables compared to the design of a Vee bottomed monohull. I do not know of any accurate method available to optimize stepped hull design other than by model testing.

Stepped hulls dominated race boat design until about 1938 when Adolph Apel patented the three point hydroplane configuration. Ventnor three point hydroplanes dominated small limited class racing, yet stepped hulls were running competitively in Unlimited class racing up until 1949. In 1950, Slo-Mo-Shun demonstrated 'prop riding' and boosted the world speed record significantly. (More on 'prop riding" later.)

Stepped hulls definitely have the potential of being significantly more efficient than rnonohulls.

Compare the Limit Lines on the Performance Factor graphs. There are a number of reasons why stepped hulls did not become popular for pleasure boats.

(a) Complexity of design, and the costs of development.

(b) Stepped hulls were banned from gold cup racing from 1920 to 1931. Wealthy race boat owners were not investing in stepped hull development.

(c) There were quite a few relatively small stepped 'gentleman's racers' built, but few of these were really efficient.

(d) There were many huge war-surplus aircraft engines available after the first world war, at reasonable prices, and few light weight marine engines available. It was easier, (and possibly cheaper) to buy a big engine for a monohull, than to develop an efficient stepped hull.

OSO....You have been schooled
Like you knew this also ....you just got schooled when you found this info on the net
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Old 11-01-2005, 11:24 AM
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Default Re: What was the first stepped V-Bottom??

Interesting stuff there guys...that was a hell of a history lesson, thanks for the info.
I was looking more for the progression of stepped hulls through the last decade. How come most manufacturers are making stepped hulls now, but some aren't, such as Sonic?
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Old 11-01-2005, 11:35 AM
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Default Re: What was the first stepped V-Bottom??

Fountain went to the stepped hull in 1995. 1994 was still a flat bottom boat.
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