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Outerlimits cat?

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Old 04-03-2006, 10:28 PM
  #21
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Default Re: Outerlimits cat?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Byrdman
Pleeeeze...how you going to run alcohol in a pleasure boat all the time...????..You have to get them to a certain temp then nail it...the variance in temp will change the tune up then they will blow up...you guys are the only ones on alcohol maybe it will be for speed runs..
I never said these motors were going into the cat. They will be going into the Kilo Boat I believe. But Bob definately told me they would be on alcohol. Surely one of you Outerlimits boys can clue you in on that.

Last edited by 44MTI; 04-03-2006 at 10:38 PM.
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Old 04-03-2006, 10:39 PM
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Default Re: Outerlimits cat?

Quote:
Originally Posted by 42MTI
I never said these motors were going into the cat. They will be going into the Kilo Boat I believe. But Bob definately told me they would be on alcohol. Surely one of you Outerlimits boys can clue you in on that.
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Old 04-03-2006, 10:52 PM
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Default Re: Outerlimits cat?

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Originally Posted by Bigyellowcat
the ski race boats are not trying to make 2000 hp and live for 200 hours, I have ran turbos for 3 years and have never blown a turbo up, my motor guy has done turbos for 16 years fabricating his own stuff, not using the off the shelf stuff. I have melted aluminum KE headers several times ( but alot of other people have too, and it is a casting flaw in them, one of the ones we melted we cut open and found alot of really thin spots) we have broke the welds on the intercooler (when we had them built we were only going to run 8 lbs boost, they never broke till we started running 25 lbs boost that they were not designed to handle) my drivetrain is totally different than anyone else's, we have a driveshaft hooked directly to my crank and have broke drivesavers that were rated for 2000 hp, we broke several driveshafts, and now the only problem we have is breaking props. but looking at what the other marine engine builders are trying to do, we can see things that we had problems with 10 years ago and worked through and they are just going to try to do trial and error to solve them.

Tyson
Friend of mine just grenaded his twin turbo 525 ci engine first pass down the quarter mile. He was using some sort of ethynol (excuse my ignorance on the exact blend) that had his inlet air temps so low, he basically hydrauliced the motor. Bent a steel oliver rod like it was aluminum. His engine man suggested not using the giant intercooler. I'm guessing he won't need a cooling system on the block either. Anyway he has much trial and error in his future to deal with.
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Old 04-03-2006, 10:56 PM
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Default Re: Outerlimits cat?

Quote:
Originally Posted by 42MTI
I never said these motors were going into the cat. They will be going into the Kilo Boat I believe. But Bob definately told me they would be on alcohol. Surely one of you Outerlimits boys can clue you in on that.
I was misled by the swamp english in post 7....masher just said to let it slide..
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Old 04-04-2006, 12:26 AM
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Default Re: Outerlimits cat?

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Just who I had in mind.
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Old 04-04-2006, 07:27 AM
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Default Re: Outerlimits cat?

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Originally Posted by Sean H
that is ouwantsome's nor-tech 43....
I thought "ouwantsome" was a 50 Nortech. Is this a new boat?
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Old 04-04-2006, 10:15 AM
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Default Re: Outerlimits cat?

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Originally Posted by bikinilover
I thought "ouwantsome" was a 50 Nortech. Is this a new boat?
43, just seems like 50....
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Old 04-04-2006, 03:32 PM
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About a year old but first time out in it's new dress ( paint ).
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Old 04-04-2006, 04:42 PM
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Default Re: Outerlimits cat?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Byrdman
Pleeeeze...how you going to run alcohol in a pleasure boat all the time...????..You have to get them to a certain temp then nail it...the variance in temp will change the tune up then they will blow up...you guys are the only ones on alcohol maybe it will be for speed runs..
Byrd, can you imagine this in a boat??

"What at times seems like a simple procedure is actually a very precise process. Firing up a high compression, blown alcohol engine takes practice. Though the driver may play a role, in most cases it’s the crew person in front of the engine that is actually starting the motor. The start up procedure varies from one team to another. It also differs from a torque convertor set-up and a clutch car. Outlined below is a typical start up procedure a CIFCA crew may follow just prior to making a pass.

1. A removable aircraft style starter is attached to the blower. Cables are connected to a portable 36-40 volt battery pack.

2. A small hand wheel on the end of the starter is turned clockwise to engage the starter dogs. This prevents slamming the starter dog when power is supplied.

3. The driver ensures the car is in park or neutral. If a clutch car, the clutch is engaged. Pressure is applied to the brake and the magneto switch is in the off (grounded) position. The 3-way fuel shutoff valve must be in the open position.

4. Once a clear signal is received from a track official, a small of gasoline is manually squirted into the injector using a hand held primer bottle. Gas is used since it ignites much easier than alcohol at the slower cranking speeds.

5. The crew person engages a momentary toggle switch on the starter. Once the engine has reached full cranking speed (2-3 seconds), the magneto(s) are switched on.

6. As the engine comes to life, the crew person immediately primes the injector with additional gas. Even though the butterflies are closed, there is an air gap of approximately .010" and a vacuum sucks the gas in. If he delays, the engine may die since it takes several seconds for the main fuel system to pick up the alcohol from the fuel tank.

7. The driver should be watching for sufficient oil pressure at this time. If he hears the engine starting to die, he should not press on the throttle pedal. Doing so will open the butterflies allowing extra air to the engine though minimal fuel. Have faith in your crew.

8. Once the engine changes tone from a smooth idle to a slight crackling, the crew person can stop priming. The engine has picked up the alcohol and additional priming will cause too rich of a condition.

9. The starter is removed from the blower, the body is lowered and the driver is ready to make a burnout. There is no rush since blown alcohol engines build up heat very slow.

The above procedure may seem simple but actually requires practice and a keen ear. The engine will die if too much, or not enough gas is primed at the exact moment. One should also be careful removing the 40lb starter since it is very close to the turning blower belt. And one must always be aware of their surroundings since the car can lurch forward at any time. Only necessary crew person should be standing in front of the funny car."
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Old 04-04-2006, 07:31 PM
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Default Re: Outerlimits cat?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Panther
Byrd, can you imagine this in a boat??

"What at times seems like a simple procedure is actually a very precise process. Firing up a high compression, blown alcohol engine takes practice. Though the driver may play a role, in most cases it’s the crew person in front of the engine that is actually starting the motor. The start up procedure varies from one team to another. It also differs from a torque convertor set-up and a clutch car. Outlined below is a typical start up procedure a CIFCA crew may follow just prior to making a pass.

1. A removable aircraft style starter is attached to the blower. Cables are connected to a portable 36-40 volt battery pack.

2. A small hand wheel on the end of the starter is turned clockwise to engage the starter dogs. This prevents slamming the starter dog when power is supplied.

3. The driver ensures the car is in park or neutral. If a clutch car, the clutch is engaged. Pressure is applied to the brake and the magneto switch is in the off (grounded) position. The 3-way fuel shutoff valve must be in the open position.

4. Once a clear signal is received from a track official, a small of gasoline is manually squirted into the injector using a hand held primer bottle. Gas is used since it ignites much easier than alcohol at the slower cranking speeds.

5. The crew person engages a momentary toggle switch on the starter. Once the engine has reached full cranking speed (2-3 seconds), the magneto(s) are switched on.

6. As the engine comes to life, the crew person immediately primes the injector with additional gas. Even though the butterflies are closed, there is an air gap of approximately .010" and a vacuum sucks the gas in. If he delays, the engine may die since it takes several seconds for the main fuel system to pick up the alcohol from the fuel tank.

7. The driver should be watching for sufficient oil pressure at this time. If he hears the engine starting to die, he should not press on the throttle pedal. Doing so will open the butterflies allowing extra air to the engine though minimal fuel. Have faith in your crew.

8. Once the engine changes tone from a smooth idle to a slight crackling, the crew person can stop priming. The engine has picked up the alcohol and additional priming will cause too rich of a condition.

9. The starter is removed from the blower, the body is lowered and the driver is ready to make a burnout. There is no rush since blown alcohol engines build up heat very slow.

The above procedure may seem simple but actually requires practice and a keen ear. The engine will die if too much, or not enough gas is primed at the exact moment. One should also be careful removing the 40lb starter since it is very close to the turning blower belt. And one must always be aware of their surroundings since the car can lurch forward at any time. Only necessary crew person should be standing in front of the funny car."
Good grief, thats too much like work
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