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Low Voltage- Dockside

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Old 05-31-2008, 03:06 PM
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This is a question that I need some basic answers to.
Is low voltage (less than 205v 2ph or 105v single ph) a common occurance at moorages?
If so, would a devise that would correct that problem be of an interest? Cost of course is importain. It is projected that such a devise would start at around $600.00 for a 30A system and $900. for a 50A system.
If anybody has some comments or thoughts about the above, I would appreciate hearing back.
Thanks,
Todd Coffelt
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Old 05-31-2008, 04:26 PM
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103 volts (low) and 130 volts (high) / the question is how long a period is it low and high? Surging? I think of it as blood pressure, keep it normal and you will be ok, that said be safe. Keep your boat appliances and electronics from being damaged or destroyed by power surges and brown-outs with an RV Electronics Power Line Monitor. Shuts off power surges at a maximum 130 volts in 1/4 of a second and too-low power at 103 volts in 3 1/2 seconds. At 208 volts (per line), the PLM starts to absorb any surge your RV may experience, clamping the surge at 340 volts (per line). Safety tested at 1500 volts. Monitors power to your RV at a minimum of 70 volts. 5 minute recycle delay allows changing voltages and compressor cycles (air conditioner and refrigerator) to stabilize before automatically restoring power. LED power status indicators. Use between generator and coach power system or between coach and park power outlet. $250.00 -$450.00 depending on voltage,
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Old 06-01-2008, 12:31 AM
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I've not heard of low line voltage being a problem.

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Old 06-01-2008, 08:47 AM
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What you want has been around for years.

No worry about complete shut off at too high or too low.

Just constant regulated voltage regardless of input.

http://www.sola-hevi-duty.com/produc...ioning/cvs.htm

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Old 06-01-2008, 09:19 AM
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I had trouble with low voltage this past weekend. My AC compressor couldn't come on. Switched to a different outlet on the dock and all was good..
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Old 06-01-2008, 04:32 PM
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Replying to Velocity Vector and Pesky Varmit. First to Velocity Vector.
The product that is pictured is a Line Monitor that does have high/low shutoffs.
It does not have any surge protection built into the circuitry. I do not feel that this product has been manufactured for at least the last 5 years. I have tried to call the 800 number many times before.
Now the item that is referred by Pesky Varmit is a line conditioner. This device eliminates all of the "gray noise" that may be a problem in marine applications for electronics. It also tries to maintain a constant voltage within a very narrow range. This product does not appear to boost voltage, but to keep the spikes and lows to a minimum.

What I have envisioned is a device that will automatically raise the voltage when required, instead of doing nothing and toasting your A/C and other appliances, or having a surge protector that shuts your power off when the voltage is low.
This device should be portable, weighing less that 50 lbs. It should also be able to perminatley install onboard.
The RV industry has such devices, but they are not of sufficient boost capabilities that would be required for marine use. They also are not resistant enough for the rigors of the corrosive environment of marine use.
I have just put a prototype 50A voltage booster on a friends trawler. This unit has a 24% boost. It should deliver acceptable voltage with supplied voltage down to 195v.
This friend of mine lost a compressor in one of his A/C units last year because of low voltage.
Has this happened to anybody else?
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Old 06-01-2008, 05:47 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Todd Coffelt View Post
This is a question that I need some basic answers to.
Is low voltage (less than 205v 2ph or 105v single ph) a common occurance at moorages?
If so, would a devise that would correct that problem be of an interest? Cost of course is importain. It is projected that such a devise would start at around $600.00 for a 30A system and $900. for a 50A system.
If anybody has some comments or thoughts about the above, I would appreciate hearing back.
Thanks,
Todd Coffelt
Line conditioners.
Topaz makes them as well as Square D.

They basicaly are step up step down muti tap transformers
that sense line voltage and automaticaly adjust output.

You need to size the load of your boat with the rating of the
unit.
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Old 06-01-2008, 05:51 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Todd Coffelt View Post
What I have envisioned is a device that will automatically raise the voltage when required, instead of doing nothing and toasting your A/C and other appliances, or having a surge protector that shuts your power off when the voltage is low.
This device should be portable, weighing less that 50 lbs. It should also be able to perminatley install onboard.
The RV industry has such devices, but they are not of sufficient boost capabilities that would be required for marine use. They also are not resistant enough for the rigors of the corrosive environment of marine use.
IHas this happened to anybody else?
less then 50lbs will be tough for the loads required on
a typical marine ac.
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Old 06-01-2008, 06:29 PM
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Thanks Knot-Right,
Yes, The installation has been out there for over two weeks now. Thank you for asking.
The transformers that are being used have been tested at full load with a temperature rise of only 7 degrees centigrade. That is less than 10 degrees fahrenheit. This test was done on continuous operation. The transformers have been proven to provide continuous service at full load, I feel that I will be able to offer a one year warranty on this item.
I tested these at my lab with a full load of 80A for 10 min.
The thermal specs are 10 degrees centigrade- Continous operation. I am confident that they will not be a problem, my question, is there a market?
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Old 06-01-2008, 06:30 PM
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Also, Thanks to Michael for replying.
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