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Are sea pumps and sea strainers the same?

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Old 04-13-2010, 12:18 PM
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Default Are sea pumps and sea strainers the same?

We do alot of beaching and yesterday I got some sand and ate up the rubber impeller. Doesn't happen alot but occassionally. Especially bad at the beginning of the season when the sandbars have moved and I am learning how the water has changed the beaches. I have been curious if a sea pump and a seat strainer are items that work in conjunction, the same thing, or 2 totally different ways of handling the water. I would really appreciate some clarification.
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Old 04-13-2010, 12:43 PM
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Sea strainers do exactly that and strain things like seaweed and debris out of the water before it reaches the sea water pump with the impeller. They look like coffee cans mounted in the bottom of the bilge with strainers in them.

That said, they are not that much good for sand. There is one manufacturer that markets a "sand strainer". It's supposedly does help in that arena. Do a search on here and you should find it.

If you do beach, the best way is to coast in, kill the motors, and trim it up as you approach the beach. Set an anchor or sand-spike in the sand to secure the boat vs. making sure you are far enough up on the sand to 'stay put'.

When it comes to getting off the sand, push the boat off by hand, and then fire the motors when the drives are in plenty of water.

You can't beach these things like a PWC or jet-boat.
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Old 04-13-2010, 09:59 PM
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Drives with low water pickups seem to be the worst for sucking up sand.
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Old 04-13-2010, 10:13 PM
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Mine has that... Can they be changed?
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Old 04-13-2010, 10:42 PM
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You have low water pickups for a reason. If they were higher you would lose water pressure.
Sidwayz summed it up for you. You have a high performance boat.
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Old 04-14-2010, 12:10 AM
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Originally Posted by Brad Zastrow View Post
You have low water pickups for a reason. If they were higher you would lose water pressure.
Sidwayz summed it up for you. You have a high performance boat.
Really? Glad you chimed in..... I was also thinking of this. Installing the high water pickups that is ... any other info?
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Old 04-14-2010, 12:19 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sydwayz View Post
Sea strainers do exactly that and strain things like seaweed and debris out of the water before it reaches the sea water pump with the impeller. They look like coffee cans mounted in the bottom of the bilge with strainers in them.

That said, they are not that much good for sand. There is one manufacturer that markets a "sand strainer". It's supposedly does help in that arena. Do a search on here and you should find it.

If you do beach, the best way is to coast in, kill the motors, and trim it up as you approach the beach. Set an anchor or sand-spike in the sand to secure the boat vs. making sure you are far enough up on the sand to 'stay put'.

When it comes to getting off the sand, push the boat off by hand, and then fire the motors when the drives are in plenty of water.

You can't beach these things like a PWC or jet-boat.
I wish that was option for me.
Our river has a 4-5mph current, so there is no coasting in or pushing off by hand. Fortunately I know the river pretty well and my boat is long enough that the stern is in deep enough water most of the time. I plugged an engine once a couple years ago and 16 miles home on one engine in the dark was no fun at all. It took me another 6 hrs to get all the sand cleared out.
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Old 04-14-2010, 09:35 AM
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We back in when going to a beach/island. We drop an anchor off the front when backing in and then put another anchor off the back or a spike to hold the boat in place. This also allows us to pull the boat far enough off shore, using the front anchor, prior to starting the motors in shallow water. The back of the boat is usually in waist deep water (maybe a little deeper) with plenty of room under the hull and drives. Has always worked well for us.

I couldn't imagine sliding my hull up onto a beach through the sand. Gives me chills just thinking about it.
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Old 04-14-2010, 10:15 AM
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We also have a stronger current on the ohio here so I cant coast in. The gel coat is still thick on the bottom where I beach her. I usually have no problems throughout the year but like I said yesterday was our second day out and I am learning where the river has reshaped the island and shifted the sandbars over the high water winters. I do understand that its a performance boat but was just curious if there was a better option. I appreciate all the help. Like I always say there is no stupid question if you want to be knowledgeable.
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Old 04-14-2010, 11:24 AM
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I for one think it wrong to beach a performance boat, but if you insist there is way to prevent the sand issue. Run large ball valve tee fittings on your water pickups with a hose running out the side of the boat with a thru hull fitting just below the water line at idle. Off plane switch the manual valves to pull water off the side of the boat. DO NOT forget to switch back before planning off.
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