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Trim ? any help

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Old 07-28-2010, 09:55 PM
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Would it be safe to say when someone is trimmed for max speed and hits a big wave that can cause a trip and a stuff?

Everyone says "overtrimming" can cause this, but I assume it's more of over trimmed for the conditions, not the boat......ie it's not trimmed beyond where it gains speed.
I would like to avoid the trip and stuff .Thats why I asked all of you pro's for your thoughts on this topic. I dont think I have to worry about that to much my boat is heavy and its no 80mph boat.
Thank you for all the input guy's !!!!!
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Old 07-29-2010, 12:41 PM
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Originally Posted by rlj676 View Post
Would it be safe to say when someone is trimmed for max speed and hits a big wave that can cause a trip and a stuff?

Everyone says "overtrimming" can cause this, but I assume it's more of over trimmed for the conditions, not the boat......ie it's not trimmed beyond where it gains speed.
Somebody should probably note that kiting a boat off one wave, then landing on the stern to cause a stuff is more correctly dealt with using trim tabs that drive trim. Trimming the drive in has a somewhat limited ability to control the attitude a boat flies through the air at after launching off a wave. This is even more true in ocean conditions where waves are further apart.

Trim tabs on the other hand can be very effectively used to “trip” a boat back down just as it comes off of a wave crest. (You just can’t do that with drive trim.) When you see somebody really driving a high performance boat correctly in rough water, the bow will not be randomly aimed at the sky. You’ll see a nice, level ride attitude almost no matter what kind of wave is encountered. When you see somebody pointed at the sky – and they have trim tabs – that’s because they either didn’t know how to use them or didn’t have them set properly. Just like learning how much trim to use on your boat, proper use of trim tabs is one of those things you have to learn through experience.
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Old 07-29-2010, 06:33 PM
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Somebody should probably note that kiting a boat off one wave, then landing on the stern to cause a stuff is more correctly dealt with using trim tabs that drive trim. Trimming the drive in has a somewhat limited ability to control the attitude a boat flies through the air at after launching off a wave. This is even more true in ocean conditions where waves are further apart.

Trim tabs on the other hand can be very effectively used to “trip” a boat back down just as it comes off of a wave crest. (You just can’t do that with drive trim.) When you see somebody really driving a high performance boat correctly in rough water, the bow will not be randomly aimed at the sky. You’ll see a nice, level ride attitude almost no matter what kind of wave is encountered. When you see somebody pointed at the sky – and they have trim tabs – that’s because they either didn’t know how to use them or didn’t have them set properly. Just like learning how much trim to use on your boat, proper use of trim tabs is one of those things you have to learn through experience.
Thanks for the input, that makes some sense to me.
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Old 07-29-2010, 09:03 PM
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Do you have "Trim Indicators"??? So you know where your drive and tabs are? if so, go out when it's smooth water and trim the drive (with the tabs level or up) until you get max speed, then mark the indicator, there will never be a time when you need to trim higher than that mark. then when the water has a bit of chop run the boat hard and trim the drive until it feels good and then start reasearching the tabs, when going fast both tabs need to be at the same level, whether it be up or down they have to go together. this type of testing is best done with the wife and kids on the dock, just you and one or two of your buds (buddies ). as stated before seat time is the best teacher and it's usually by learning what NOT To do...
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Old 07-30-2010, 07:31 PM
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Do you have "Trim Indicators"??? So you know where your drive and tabs are? if so, go out when it's smooth water and trim the drive (with the tabs level or up) until you get max speed, then mark the indicator, there will never be a time when you need to trim higher than that mark. then when the water has a bit of chop run the boat hard and trim the drive until it feels good and then start reasearching the tabs, when going fast both tabs need to be at the same level, whether it be up or down they have to go together. this type of testing is best done with the wife and kids on the dock, just you and one or two of your buds (buddies ). as stated before seat time is the best teacher and it's usually by learning what NOT To do...
Thank you for your input that souds like great advice ! I do not have trim indicators and my tabs are not adjustable . I will remember that for my next boat !
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