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Edmund Fitzgerald

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Old 11-10-2010, 01:09 PM
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Default Edmund Fitzgerald

Today makes 35 years since the Edmund Fitzgerald went down.

Informative piece here.

http://www.cnn.com/2010/US/11/09/edm...ex.html?hpt=C2

R.I.P.
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Old 11-10-2010, 01:43 PM
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Ring the bell 29 time for each man who died that day.

R.I.P.
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Old 11-10-2010, 01:45 PM
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I was 11 when the EF went down. I'm not into folk music or folk musicians at all, but Gordon Lightfoot sure captured the haunting mood of that shipwreck in his song. One of my favorite songs. R.I.P.
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Old 11-10-2010, 01:45 PM
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It still amazes me that it sunk. Here in MI and whitefish point there is a shipwreck museum with the bell of this ship.
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Old 11-10-2010, 02:10 PM
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What's totally forgotten is the sinking of the Carl D. Bradley in northern Lake Michigan November 18, 1958. Similar boat and conditions but two men survived.
Sadly it's forgotten, probably because no song was written about it.
http://www.carldbradley.org/
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Old 11-10-2010, 02:26 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Interceptor View Post
What's totally forgotten is the sinking of the Carl D. Bradley in northern Lake Michigan November 18, 1958. Similar boat and conditions but two men survived.
Sadly it's forgotten, probably because no song was written about it.
http://www.carldbradley.org/
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There are so many that have sank on the Great Lakes.....The Edmund was the most recent is all.
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Old 11-10-2010, 02:30 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Baja_man View Post
It still amazes me that it sunk. Here in MI and whitefish point there is a shipwreck museum with the bell of this ship.
The museum is not huge, but it is staggering to learn what men went through years ago.
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Old 11-10-2010, 02:37 PM
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Local news said the ship was in 80 to 100 mph winds. Ive never heard that before and not sure abou the accuracy. But WOW
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Old 11-10-2010, 02:55 PM
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[youtube]hgI8bta-7aw[/youtube]

The legend lives on from the Chippewa on down
of the big lake they called "Gitche Gumee."
The lake, it is said, never gives up her dead
when the skies of November turn gloomy.
With a load of iron ore twenty-six thousand tons more
than the Edmund Fitzgerald weighed empty,
that good ship and true was a bone to be chewed
when the "Gales of November" came early.

The ship was the pride of the American side
coming back from some mill in Wisconsin.
As the big freighters go, it was bigger than most
with a crew and good captain well seasoned,
concluding some terms with a couple of steel firms
when they left fully loaded for Cleveland.
And later that night when the ship's bell rang,
could it be the north wind they'd been feelin'?

The wind in the wires made a tattle-tale sound
and a wave broke over the railing.
And ev'ry man knew, as the captain did too
'twas the witch of November come stealin'.
The dawn came late and the breakfast had to wait
when the Gales of November came slashin'.
When afternoon came it was freezin' rain
in the face of a hurricane west wind.

When suppertime came the old cook came on deck sayin'.

"Fellas, it's too rough t'feed ya."
At seven P.M. a main hatchway caved in; he said,
"Fellas, it's bin good t'know ya!"
The captain wired in he had water comin' in
and the good ship and crew was in peril.
And later that night when 'is lights went outta sight
came the wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald.

Does any one know where the love of God goes
when the waves turn the minutes to hours?
The searchers all say they'd have made Whitefish Bay
if they'd put fifteen more miles behind 'er.
They might have split up or they might have capsized;
they may have broke deep and took water.
And all that remains is the faces and the names
of the wives and the sons and the daughters.

Lake Huron rolls, Superior sings
in the rooms of her ice-water mansion.
Old Michigan steams like a young man's dreams;
the islands and bays are for sportsmen.
And farther below Lake Ontario
takes in what Lake Erie can send her,
And the iron boats go as the mariners all know
with the Gales of November remembered.

In a musty old hall in Detroit they prayed,
in the "Maritime Sailors' Cathedral."
The church bell chimed 'til it rang twenty-nine times
for each man on the Edmund Fitzgerald.
The legend lives on from the Chippewa on down
of the big lake they call "Gitche Gumee."
"Superior," they said, "never gives up her dead
when the gales of November come early!"

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Old 11-10-2010, 03:04 PM
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I have watched Lake Michigan from the shore in Grand Haven when they were claiming 16-18 footers within 5 miles of shore. Definitely puts in perspective the sheer power of the Great Lakes and what they are capable of. I believe those were "only" 50-60 mph winds if I remember correctly.
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