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First time buyer, what would you choose?

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Old 06-29-2011, 02:30 PM
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Originally Posted by 105mph_38_2003 View Post
http://www.sunsationboats.com/mod288.htm

Joe at Sunsation can build you a brand new 80 mph 28' for less than you want to spend. Also could put you in a brand new 85 mph 32' for right around your budget, also look for preowned because for $60k you can get alot of boat. One ride and you will be sold, worth taking a weekend for a factory tour too.


(810)794-4888- ask for Joe and he can answer any question about a new or pre-owned Sunsation.
So my question here, and this applies to a lot of the post I'm reading, is with some of these lesser known builders(and I hesitate to use that term because I mean no offense by it) is there a quality deficit I'll be suffering from a more known and repuitable dealer? Eliminator, howard, etc?
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Old 06-29-2011, 02:37 PM
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If your into family and have a bunch of kids a go faster is probably not the best thing. Realistically these kinds of boat only hold 4 comfortably maybe 5-6 max. They are not meant for tubing and all that jazz, and really dont always have the spots and locations for the storage. Not trying to change your mind just give you things to think about. If you want something of boath worlds then try a Formula Sun Sport, they go fas probably60mph or so have a cuddy and huge cockpit. I would agree with others, first boat ever and spending 160k I dont know. I dont know your finance situation but if you got tons and tons of money then why not, but if your going to make payments then find something cheaper ride it for a year and then go up. If you buy this boat new your going to eat the depreciation on it, even if you have it for two years, in this market you would be lucky to get rid of it for probably 100-120. Think about maint and fuel cost as well, hi performance boats are no joke.
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Old 06-29-2011, 02:42 PM
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Otherwise there are alot of family cuddy/open bow type boats out there that will do 55mph. Doing 65mph + on a boat I would consider dang good.

try powerboatlistings and look at different brands out there. There are some pretty sporty crownlines out there. Even a Baja could be a go fast and be more family friendly. If you got 2-4 kids and want to do water sports these boats are not for you. You drive them fast and park em thats about it
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Old 06-29-2011, 03:41 PM
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If your into family and have a bunch of kids a go faster is probably not the best thing. Realistically these kinds of boat only hold 4 comfortably maybe 5-6 max. They are not meant for tubing and all that jazz, and really dont always have the spots and locations for the storage. Not trying to change your mind just give you things to think about. If you want something of boath worlds then try a Formula Sun Sport, they go fas probably60mph or so have a cuddy and huge cockpit. I would agree with others, first boat ever and spending 160k I dont know. I dont know your finance situation but if you got tons and tons of money then why not, but if your going to make payments then find something cheaper ride it for a year and then go up. If you buy this boat new your going to eat the depreciation on it, even if you have it for two years, in this market you would be lucky to get rid of it for probably 100-120. Think about maint and fuel cost as well, hi performance boats are no joke.
I'll second and third this - you don't know how you're going to spend your boating time. You might *think* you know, but until you spend time on the water, you won't know for certain.

And you'll be tasting the salt water from your tears when you find out your $160K brand new boat - which now does not fit your boating lifestyle - is only worth $120K after a year.

I would look at a 3-5 year old used boat, that is usually around the sweet spot in the depreciation curve. Spend half your budget and you have all sorts of options. I'd also recommend you sit down with the family and figure out what you want to do on the water.

Blast from point A to point B? A good offshore can do that all day long.

Pull tubes, boards and skiers? An offshore is about the last boat you'd want.

Have lots of friends and relatives out for a day on the water? Better have plenty of seating, deck space, and an enclosed head!

Want to fish? Have to take that into account, rod storage, etc.

Lots of choices out there....

(Example, my first boat was 23' Searay cuddy cabin, followed by a 28' single engine offshore, then a 29' twin offshore - now I'm looking for a cruiser and a small fishing boat...)
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Old 06-29-2011, 03:47 PM
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The Mastercraft X-star is a pretty big boat that I am sure you could put any performance package you would want in it, vette, etc. They definitely have the room and with the right customization, sound and look sweet for a family esque boat so to speak...especially with the cash you are talking about spending. I am not too sure, but I thought Ilmor now offers their Viper package with Mastercraft...

Last edited by jctexas07; 06-29-2011 at 03:53 PM.
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Old 06-29-2011, 03:58 PM
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I'll second and third this - you don't know how you're going to spend your boating time. You might *think* you know, but until you spend time on the water, you won't know for certain.

And you'll be tasting the salt water from your tears when you find out your $160K brand new boat - which now does not fit your boating lifestyle - is only worth $120K after a year.

I would look at a 3-5 year old used boat, that is usually around the sweet spot in the depreciation curve. Spend half your budget and you have all sorts of options. I'd also recommend you sit down with the family and figure out what you want to do on the water.

Blast from point A to point B? A good offshore can do that all day long.

Pull tubes, boards and skiers? An offshore is about the last boat you'd want.

Have lots of friends and relatives out for a day on the water? Better have plenty of seating, deck space, and an enclosed head!

Want to fish? Have to take that into account, rod storage, etc.

Lots of choices out there....

(Example, my first boat was 23' Searay cuddy cabin, followed by a 28' single engine offshore, then a 29' twin offshore - now I'm looking for a cruiser and a small fishing boat...)
I didnt think about fishing. And your right there is not room to put anything or anybody in a hi perf boat. Like you said depreication hits hard at year 3-5 then again at 10. My first boat was a 225 Crownline Cuddy. Nice boat went 50 and would be better for kids.
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Old 06-29-2011, 04:29 PM
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Most boaters only keep their boats on average 4 years. Most first time boaters keep their first boat for 2 years. With that in mind I would start out buying something used on the lower end (around $50K). After two years you will know exactly what you want and then it will be a better time to buy newer at $160K. And for that kind of money you can do an all custom build and get EXACTLY what you want.

Also a few good general rules. Repairs and maintenance on a new boat will run around 4% of the purchase price. A used boat will run around 7-10%. A boat in below average condition will cost 100% of the purchase cost to refurbish (new motors or rebuilds, upholstery, etc). A boat in average condition will cost 50-100% of purchase price to refurbish. Allthough the website talks mostly about yachts I would recommend reading over various articles on www.yachtsurvey.com. He has a good boat buying book as well that can save you a lot of money in the long run.

Don't waist your time searching for the perfect boat - there is no such thing. Boats are designed to do one or two things very well. Find out what one or two things you want the boat to do very well and work from there (rough water, water sports, overnighting, entertaining, racing, etc)

Last edited by TexomaPowerboater; 06-29-2011 at 04:33 PM.
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Old 06-29-2011, 04:29 PM
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New to boating is the key. Many have gone from 13' Boston Whalers to bowriders to Fountains and then to a cruiser. Havasu can get pretty crowded with big waves on weekends from what I hear. If your kids are younger, you'll probably not want a pure performance boat. (does the wife get a vote here too?) You'd better think about that a lot

You have a pretty large budget. So here's what I'd look at, and it depends heavily on what your local area has for dealers, or at Havasu for that matter. If you're towing, what do you have for a rig? This can get pretty expensive in a hurry.

A fantastic line of top notch boats, and usually available in great condition used boats as well. Definitely consider a used boat.

Cobalt 276 BR. Nice enclosed head, plenty of room, top notch hull and materials.

MSRP starts at $113k base. Great riding boat, great for the entire family, plenty of size for where you want to be. Not many people have ever regretted a Cobalt.

http://www.cobaltboats.com/v11/our_boats/276/index.php



If you have an inclination for salt water, maybe an outboard in another line. Just remember, these boats get pretty heavy, and can be a lot to handle trailering if you've never done it.

Bottom line, you need a better definition of why you want a boat, and what you'd envision doing with it. Perhaps renting boats for awhile would be a good option.
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Old 06-29-2011, 04:48 PM
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Oh yeah, I second the cobalt. They have some nice rigs that sound like performance boats.....
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