Like Tree0Likes

When You're Buying A Boat...

Reply
Old 12-22-2011, 01:00 PM
  #1
Registered
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 1,656
Question When You're Buying A Boat...

I fully support the idea of learning all you can about an item that is for sale regarding engines, running gear, drives, condition of fuel tank, etc..

But just curious why someone would care about how many hours are on a hull vs. the powertrain that is in it??

If well cared for, a boat hull could outlast 3 humans or more.
SDFever is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 12-22-2011, 01:05 PM
  #2
Neno the mind boggler
VIP Member
Trade Score: (1)
 
glassdave's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2001
Location: toledo oh
My Boats: Batboat, 38 Scarab Thunder, 16 Sidewinder, 27 Magnum
Posts: 12,667
Default

just more info maybe, bargaining chip or something. I agree though hull hours really doesnt mean much. Well built hull will out last many many engines and operators. . .
__________________
Throttles- Cleveland Construction 377 Talon
08 OPA Class 1 National Champion
08 Class 1 Geico Triple Crown Champion
08 OPA High Points Champion
10 OPA Class 1 National Champion ( happy now Ed! )
glassdave is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 12-22-2011, 01:24 PM
  #3
Registered
 
Join Date: Jun 2001
Location: Michigan
My Boats: It's how well you go fast
Posts: 3,345
Default

how long it's been in the water. high hour boats are generally by water! that in its self does strange things! a boat stored around lake havasu vs. great lakes (even upper and lower) vs miami will all be different. let alone 3 feet above the water source in a lift.
condition of fuel tanks.
rigging.
wiring.
stringer condition.
just had the opportunity to see first hand repairing a race boats, pleasure offshore boats, and doing refits on yachts that all looked great where one could see.
audacity is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 12-22-2011, 02:12 PM
  #4
Registered
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 1,656
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by audacity View Post
how long it's been in the water. high hour boats are generally by water! that in its self does strange things! a boat stored around lake havasu vs. great lakes (even upper and lower) vs miami will all be different. let alone 3 feet above the water source in a lift.
condition of fuel tanks.
rigging.
wiring.
stringer condition.
just had the opportunity to see first hand repairing a race boats, pleasure offshore boats, and doing refits on yachts that all looked great where one could see.
But you're talking mostly storage. Running hours on a hull is a useless number.

For instance, transom rot has nothing to do with how it was used or ran. It has mostly to do with low quality workmanship either with thru-hull fittings or build.
SDFever is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 12-22-2011, 02:39 PM
  #5
Registered
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Tallahassee, FL
My Boats: 1987 Donzi 22; 2008 Donzi 28 ZXO
Posts: 1,654
Default

stress cracks tend to appear with hull time.

knowing about all the rigging would matter to me too. you could have zero hours on the engine but 10,000 on the hull including the trim tab pumps, trim pumps, cables, etc. That certainly makes a difference.

Also stringer issues, etc. tend to come from use. If a boat hull has low hours and stored indoors the likelihood of major structural issues is less than a boat with a ton of hours stored outside.
VetteLT193 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 12-22-2011, 03:24 PM
  #6
Registered
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Killeen Texas/Fort Hood
My Boats: 2006 Sunsation Dominator SS
Posts: 753
Default

Seems to me hull hours would be measured in years (time since the boat was built). If you balance that against how many hours on the engine, you would be able to make a decent assumption (assuming all is normal and the boat was not used for jumping over cuddly animals on rafts or anything) as to the condition of the rest of the hull. A boat made in 1986 with 200 hours obviously sees a lot less abuse than a 2000 model with 400 hours. Of course nothing is quite a reliable as a complete run through on the boat itself, in person.
Jay Gadsby is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 12-22-2011, 03:43 PM
  #7
Registered
Trade Score: (1)
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Chicago
My Boats: 38 Flatdeck
Posts: 5,780
Default

Do you care about mileage on a car when you`re buying one?
Hell yeah. On a boat the more hours it sat in the sun, water etc is going to tell you how "used" it is and whats going to be needed to be replaced.
ICDEDPPL is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 12-22-2011, 04:10 PM
  #8
Registered
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Grand Lake (E-Dock Junior Varsity)
My Boats: 24 Skater, 292 SR-1 Formula, 382 Fastech, 41 PC
Posts: 3,017
Default

I would almost HATE to know how many hours are on my hull!

Its had 5 different motor combinations on it, 3 complete redos and was an ex raceboat.. And not a thing wrong with the hull..
waterboy222 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 12-22-2011, 05:19 PM
  #9
Registered
 
Join Date: Jun 2001
Location: Michigan
My Boats: It's how well you go fast
Posts: 3,345
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by SDFever View Post
But you're talking mostly storage. Running hours on a hull is a useless number.

For instance, transom rot has nothing to do with how it was used or ran. It has mostly to do with low quality workmanship either with thru-hull fittings or build.

No, I am saying that boats with high hours on them; are for the most part stored very close to the water. If not in a hoist over it...If not in the water. Now where is that water located?

AND i have seen rot in the best of manufactures. boats that cost millions and millions and have people paid hundreds of thousands to take care of them. Hours on a boat=history...the most history the greater of chance something has happened in its history that you would not want.
audacity is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 12-22-2011, 05:19 PM
  #10
Platinum Member
Platinum Member
Trade Score: (1)
 
articfriends's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Frankenmuth
My Boats: EX 99 MPH 272 Baja owner, 1999 Scarab 33 AVS NOW
Posts: 6,072
Default

I think hull hours are REAL important, the more I have ran my boat in last 10 years thre more stuff has fallen apart on it and had to be put back together, obviously the more times screws are put in holes, fibreglass is fixed, stuff re-reigged eventually stuff becomes stressed/wore out. Its definately different than a car BUT if I was selling you a pick up truck that had 600,000 miles on it BUT the transmission and engine were new 2 years/80,000 miles ago wouldn't you be alarmed or looking for one with less time and hours on it??? do you think the body panels and frame on a truck thats hit 600,000 bumps in the road would be more fatigued than one thats hit 60,000 bumps, Smitty
articfriends is offline  
Reply With Quote
Reply



Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 04:07 PM.


Copyright 2011 OffShoreOnly. All rights reserved.