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Its over..... "The common man"

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Old 02-22-2012, 07:07 AM
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it amazes me that someone will pay that much money for a cat that the seats are sitiing on the floor like a bassboat....we get caught up in the paint and speeds but when you really look at the boat being built theres not much to it
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Old 02-22-2012, 07:08 AM
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Not to sound super cheap, but when i heard it was 35 dollars a head to get in i was shocked. I haven't been to a boat show in a while but that seems a high price to pay to get in to spend more money inside.
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Old 02-22-2012, 07:20 AM
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Not to sound super cheap, but when i heard it was 35 dollars a head to get in i was shocked. I haven't been to a boat show in a while but that seems a high price to pay to get in to spend more money inside.
it was $32 for thursday, the other days were $18 and it was pretty easy to find discount tickets online for $15. Well worth it even just to look at the boats and other stuff there at the convention center. To pay to go into Sea isle marina was a waste of money.
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Old 02-22-2012, 07:21 AM
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it amazes me that someone will pay that much money for a cat that the seats are sitiing on the floor like a bassboat....we get caught up in the paint and speeds but when you really look at the boat being built theres not much to it
There is alot that goes into a Skater, it is a custom built boat as are a few others, built to the customers specs. buy anything custom and you get what you pay for in this case.


It is unforunate that I am not in the 1 or 2% that could afford it.

come on Powerball! LOL
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Old 02-22-2012, 07:31 AM
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Not to sound super cheap, but when i heard it was 35 dollars a head to get in i was shocked. I haven't been to a boat show in a while but that seems a high price to pay to get in to spend more money inside.
$35.00 was the ticket price for Thursday only- "Premier Day"... I paid $18.00, which was the price of a ticket for one day, Friday thru Monday. A two-day pass that was good any two days Friday thru Monday was $32.00. The most expensive ticket was $80.00 and that was good for entry all five days, Thursday thru Monday.
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Old 02-22-2012, 07:40 AM
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This isn't a "Common Mans' " hobby. Never has been. Never will be. My .02 cents.
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Old 02-22-2012, 08:20 AM
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Allow me to offer another perspective:

Guy is making $200,000 a year. Let's say after taxes, state and federal, he nets $150,000. That would be pretty "good."

He finds a new entry-level sportboat he wants for $50,000. That, too, would be pretty "good." So he buys it. Sure, he can finance it, but that leaves him with debt on a rapidly, and I mean rapidly, depreciating asset

He has now spent one-third of his net income, a hefty chunk, on a luxury item with a price tag that is equivalent to four years of tuition for his kid at a good university in some states (and one year in a spendy private college).

But my point isn't that his hobby takes up a substantial, some would argue inordinate, chunk of his net income. My point is that ... a guy grossing $200,00 is not the common man.

Put another way, go-fast boating, even at the most affordable levels, is expensive.
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Old 02-22-2012, 08:37 AM
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Allow me to offer another perspective:

Guy is making $200,000 a year. Let's say after taxes, state and federal, he nets $150,000. That would be pretty "good."

He finds a new entry-level sportboat he wants for $50,000. That, too, would be pretty "good." So he buys it. Sure, he can finance it, but that leaves him with debt on a rapidly, and I mean rapidly, depreciating asset

He has now spent one-third of his net income, a hefty chunk, on a luxury item with a price tag that is equivalent to four years of tuition for his kid at a good university in some states (and one year in a spendy private college).

But my point isn't that his hobby takes up a substantial, some would argue inordinate, chunk of his net income. My point is that ... a guy grossing $200,00 is not the common man.

Put another way, go-fast boating, even at the most affordable levels, is expensive.
Then after all that the neighbour at the marina says its too loud, your insurance company doesn't stand behind you after you have paid too much for a policy, the repair shop rips you a new azzhole for fixing it and delivering it 3 weeks late and in the worst case some douchebag steals it from you when your back is turned.

Life is grand.LOLLOL
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Old 02-22-2012, 08:37 AM
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Originally Posted by Matt Trulio View Post
Allow me to offer another perspective:

Guy is making $200,000 a year. Let's say after taxes, state and federal, he nets $150,000. That would be pretty "good."

He finds a new entry-level sportboat he wants for $50,000. That, too, would be pretty "good." So he buys it. Sure, he can finance it, but that leaves him with debt on a rapidly, and I mean rapidly, depreciating asset

He has now spent one-third of his net income, a hefty chunk, on a luxury item with a price tag that is equivalent to four years of tuition for his kid at a good university in some states (and one year in a spendy private college).

But my point isn't that his hobby takes up a substantial, some would argue inordinate, chunk of his net income. My point is that ... a guy grossing $200,00 is not the common man.

Put another way, go-fast boating, even at the most affordable levels, is expensive.

Very well said Matt ~ Unless you're lucky enough to be in the millionaires club, boating is a HUGE chunk of our income. It's a choice that I'm sure all of us grapple with at times...

Our passion for the sport definitely clouds our common sense and enables us to rationalize it somehow, or we wouldn't be boaters!
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Old 02-22-2012, 08:49 AM
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I got into boating from the lake side and not the ocean. I was amazed through the 90's the increased size of the boats. At Lake Cumberland, Cigarettes and Scarabs of the day were very rare. Owners were assumed to be anything but a common man. The "common man" powerboater at lake Cumberland had a jet, Hydrostream outboard, or a Sea Ray with a hot engine. I went back and looked at some of my 1980's Powerboat and Hot Boat Magazines. Back then 35 footers were rare, power was far from exotic, contruction material schedules did not include anything high tech.
I was working in Somerset 1 day a week when Randy Hartmann started Lake Cumberland Marine in half of a used car lot. He started off as a Nautique dealer only and then added Sea Doo. With Sea Doo, he had a lot of sales. One day when I dropped by to talk to him, he asked me what I thought about Fountain. My opinion to him was they're a great boat but I don't know how many your going to sell here. He said I think I'm going to order a couple and see. This was at the time of the big
stock market boom. A couple years later as he was selling lots of boats, he remarked he didn't know where all the people with enough money were coming from to buy the boats.
He was a very hard worker and grew to add most of the exclusive lines of powerboats.
I'd say would agree that the economic boom of the time gave people a historic amount of disposable income.
Now the new Nautique 20 foot ski not wakeboard boat I bought had a retail of 74K. That doesn't make the OL 29 seem way out of line.
Bottom line is now I think we're moving back to the lifestyle pre boom and it's hard to accept and is hard for lots of good people in the marine industry.
I'm going to poweboat til I die even if it's on a much smaller scale.
Growing up on Cumberland I love hearing cool stories like this. Thanks for sharing!
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