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Old 08-18-2003, 11:39 PM
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I'm looking for a boat lift for a 32 fever,anybody got
any suggestions?
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Old 08-19-2003, 06:03 PM
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Come on, nobody has any suggestions for a good
lift,new or used? I dont know anything about them
so any help on makes,models & dealers would be
appreciated
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Old 08-19-2003, 06:47 PM
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hydrohoist or polylift are supposed to be good quality.
 
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Old 08-19-2003, 07:23 PM
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The best IMHO is the original Hydrohoist, tho there are others out there that seem to work well. Hydrohoist was the first, they started the whole thing, but one of the owners screwed up and let the patent expire so there is lots of competion out there now.Go with a local dealer so you will get service,if you have a local Hyrohoist guy, use him. I have 4 and have always been pleased, if something breaks the local dealer handles it quickly.
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Old 08-19-2003, 08:46 PM
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You don't specify what type of lift you're looking for. If you can put 4 piles in the best way to go is a 4 post lift that way everything is out of the water when not in use. I like Hi-Tide's aluminum lift with 10 year warranty.
If you can't drive the piles then a hydrohoist. The down side of a floating lift like a hydrohoist, it's another boat to take care of and paint every year. You'll also need to pull it and store it every year. Also, if you're in an area where there are waves and wakes you'll want a 4 post lift.

OSO has a Hi-Tide elevator, also a good choice but a 4 pile lift is still the way to go. With an elevator, from any manufacturer, be sure to install a COMPLETE disconnect switch, this includes the ground. Disconnecting the ground when the lift is not in use will extend the life by years. You can also use a 4 prong 220V shore power plug and cord to disconnect everything.
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Old 08-19-2003, 09:49 PM
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Quote:
Originally posted by mr_velocity
The down side of a floating lift like a hydrohoist, it's another boat to take care of and paint every year. You'll also need to pull it and store it every year. Also, if you're in an area where there are waves and wakes you'll want a 4 post lift.

<Norm> "I don't think so Tim"

Floating lifts do not need to be pulled, unless it is being moved, sold, or repaired from abuse. Why would you want to paint galvanized steel or the poly tanks? Floating lifts have the option for a rough water kit. The 4 pole lift are great as mentioned above, but the floating lifts float with the water level as long as you always have at least 6-7' depth for them to work.

epeek, do a search of my name and Galva Lift.
I bought a 10K lift for my 32' Fever this spring. I looked at H.H. as it is a well known name. Then I looked at Galva Lift. My G.L. has bracing under the tanks that the new H.H. lifts don't and was a bit cheaper. Only good thing about the H.H. in my mind was the newer ones have no steel below the water when in the raised position. But then, 20 yrs from now when the couple of under water braces do need replaced on mine, I doubt I'll still have it. Most all the name brand lifts are built basically the same as far as the mechanicals and the sizing of the steel.

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Old 08-19-2003, 09:58 PM
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We bought 3 of them and did the assembly and install ourselves. Looked overwhelming at 1st, but then became a peice of cake.

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Old 08-19-2003, 11:09 PM
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Are those lifts in the picture mostly for where there
are tide issues? Im in fresh water where it gets
very rough at my dock. The 32 fever takes alot
of water over the back and Im concerned with
issues of sinking if I dont get to the lake for a couple
of weeks.
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Old 08-19-2003, 11:43 PM
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No, we are on a inland lake. Indiana=freshwater. Water level varies 10 ft from spring rains to summer droughts.
We are on the breakwater, (slips sticking out in below picture) so it does get very rough when the cruisers come in. I built my own rough water kit. Basically they are wheels that extend out the sides and roll up and down against some boards mounted to the side of the dock fingers. They keep the lift from moving side to side and takes all the forces away from the swing arms and mounts. I'll get some pictures this weekend of the lift with my 32' on it. My lift is the second picture, I made a second set of bunks. If you look closely at it, you will see a horizontal brace that runs under the tanks and connects them together for a more rigid twist free setup. The newer H.H. lifts do not have this. To me, it seems like a good idea for lifts used in rough water.
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Old 08-20-2003, 01:24 AM
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I drive a 32 Fever, and store it on a 9000 lb HydroHoist boatlift. It works well for my purposes.
*HOWEVER* - MY HydroHoist requires that the stern be lowered COMPLETELY before beginning to lower the bow. This places the blower outlets below the water until the bow is lowered, allowing water into the engine compartment. The bilge pumps kick in, and pump until the bow is lowered sufficiently to allow the blower outlets to come back above the water. On several occasions, when the boat was not used for a couple weeks, this has drained my batteries to the point that the engines would not turn over. Thank God for a jumper box.

I now keep a couple beer can coolers (the little neoprene ones) in the blower outlets on the back of the transom when launching/retrieving, or when docked in sloppy conditions. This keeps water out of the engine compartment. Actually works pretty well.

Last edited by rouxsterre; 08-20-2003 at 01:37 AM.
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