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Ok MCollinsTN guess this.

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Old 11-21-2003, 09:49 AM
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Default Ok MCollinsTN guess this.

Ok, if a electric train is heading south, at 40 miles an hour. A head wind of 20 with gusts to 30. How fast does the smoke go away from it?
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Old 11-21-2003, 10:01 AM
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Why in the world would an electric train be blowing smoke?
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Old 11-21-2003, 10:33 AM
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All modern commercial trains in this country are electric these days. Most have diesel powered generators, though, and under load they definitely produce some degree of smoke (or soot-laden exhausts).

Since the question has the ambiguous nature of being entirely nonspecific as to "what smoke" or "smoke of what origin" we are talking about AND uses the even more vague term of "go away from it", we have a situation with many possible correct answers.

Smoke originating from a source not contained within the definition of "train" (whether train means the engines themselves, or the entire chain of boxcars, etc) could be located anywhere in a polar coordinate circle from the "train" at an angle and distance at a given point in time. Depending on that location, the vector of the wind direction (defined as Headwind at that exact moment in time) calculated with regards to the location of the origin of the smoke will give us a relative speed of the smoke in regards to the stationary position of the train at the moment in question. Then we must take into account the direction of motion of the train and figure the triangle to give us the adjusted relative delta v of the wind - take note that if the source of the smoke is behind the train's position, it will "go away from it" at a high rate, while if it is ahead of the train, then it will not "go away" from it at all, except in negative terms.

If the smoke in question originates FROM the train itself, the exact origin will be a factor, because if it originates from the exhaust stacks of the engine, then the velocity of the exhaust gases will play a much more significant role than the trainspeed or wind direction. The exhaust stream will indeed be "going away" from the train and can be figured and adjusted using the same trigonometric concepts.

(you haven't provided me with enough info to give a comprehensive answer).
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Old 11-21-2003, 10:59 AM
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Mr. Collins: Please step away from the coffee.
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Old 11-21-2003, 11:13 AM
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UMUUMUMMMAAAAAAAAHAHHHHHHHHHH
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Old 11-21-2003, 03:10 PM
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um....ok, what was the bus drivers name?
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Old 11-21-2003, 03:22 PM
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uh yeah...what he said
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Old 11-21-2003, 03:35 PM
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Quote:
Originally posted by mcollinstn
All modern commercial trains in this country are electric these days. Most have diesel powered generators, though, and under load they definitely produce some degree of smoke (or soot-laden exhausts).

Since the question has the ambiguous nature of being entirely nonspecific as to "what smoke" or "smoke of what origin" we are talking about AND uses the even more vague term of "go away from it", we have a situation with many possible correct answers.

Smoke originating from a source not contained within the definition of "train" (whether train means the engines themselves, or the entire chain of boxcars, etc) could be located anywhere in a polar coordinate circle from the "train" at an angle and distance at a given point in time. Depending on that location, the vector of the wind direction (defined as Headwind at that exact moment in time) calculated with regards to the location of the origin of the smoke will give us a relative speed of the smoke in regards to the stationary position of the train at the moment in question. Then we must take into account the direction of motion of the train and figure the triangle to give us the adjusted relative delta v of the wind - take note that if the source of the smoke is behind the train's position, it will "go away from it" at a high rate, while if it is ahead of the train, then it will not "go away" from it at all, except in negative terms.

If the smoke in question originates FROM the train itself, the exact origin will be a factor, because if it originates from the exhaust stacks of the engine, then the velocity of the exhaust gases will play a much more significant role than the trainspeed or wind direction. The exhaust stream will indeed be "going away" from the train and can be figured and adjusted using the same trigonometric concepts.

(you haven't provided me with enough info to give a comprehensive answer).

Its a good thing this wasnt a multiple choice question!!!!!!!!!
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Old 11-21-2003, 03:51 PM
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Quote:
Originally posted by mcollinstn
All modern commercial trains in this country are electric these days. Most have diesel powered generators, though, and under load they definitely produce some degree of smoke (or soot-laden exhausts).

Since the question has the ambiguous nature of being entirely nonspecific as to "what smoke" or "smoke of what origin" we are talking about AND uses the even more vague term of "go away from it", we have a situation with many possible correct answers.

Smoke originating from a source not contained within the definition of "train" (whether train means the engines themselves, or the entire chain of boxcars, etc) could be located anywhere in a polar coordinate circle from the "train" at an angle and distance at a given point in time. Depending on that location, the vector of the wind direction (defined as Headwind at that exact moment in time) calculated with regards to the location of the origin of the smoke will give us a relative speed of the smoke in regards to the stationary position of the train at the moment in question. Then we must take into account the direction of motion of the train and figure the triangle to give us the adjusted relative delta v of the wind - take note that if the source of the smoke is behind the train's position, it will "go away from it" at a high rate, while if it is ahead of the train, then it will not "go away" from it at all, except in negative terms.

If the smoke in question originates FROM the train itself, the exact origin will be a factor, because if it originates from the exhaust stacks of the engine, then the velocity of the exhaust gases will play a much more significant role than the trainspeed or wind direction. The exhaust stream will indeed be "going away" from the train and can be figured and adjusted using the same trigonometric concepts.

(you haven't provided me with enough info to give a comprehensive answer).
Yep! Good answer.
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Old 11-22-2003, 10:55 PM
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The bus driver answered to:

Smitty,
Bud,
and
Sweetness.

His given name, however, was never revealed although it was popular opinion that his surname was Smith.
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