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winterizing question on 92 454 bravo

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Old 09-19-2017, 09:21 AM
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Default winterizing question on 92 454 bravo

I live in Calgary where it gets very cold. It's time to get my boat out of the lake and winterize it. I've had it for 3 years and have hired pros to winterize it in the past but this year want to do it myself. I've hired pros cause I had another boat about 6 years ago which I did a bad winterization on and I cracked the block.

My method was to run engine on muffs and garden hose until warmed up, then attach hose with funnel to muffs and pour antifreeze until it starts to come out exhaust. Then keep pouring and have buddy spray fogging oil into carb until stalls. This is what I did on my previous boat but I didn't let it warm up enough for the thermostat to open and thus the antifreeze didn't get into the engine (hence the cracked block).

So my question. Although I plan to let it idle for at least 10 minutes (15 mins to be safe) until I change over to the antifreeze, how can I be 100% sure my thermo opened and allowed the antifreeze into the block? I just want to be 100% (no 1000%) sure this time. Also what type of antifreeze should I use. I'm planning on using the pink rv plumbing antifreeze, or do I use actual car green antifreeze - its been a while so I forgot.

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Old 09-19-2017, 09:52 AM
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If I lived where it was that cold, I would just pull the thermostat out, and do the winterization. Replace it with a new one in the spring.
There is this kit which can make it a little easier. Years back, I put a schraeder valve stem on mine (like a tire) and hook up a small 12V compressor to it to force the antifreeze into the motor vs. relying on gravity and SWP suction.
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Old 09-19-2017, 10:12 AM
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I did it that same way for many many years with no issues. The key was always make sure the t-stat was open while running on muffs and would know by grabbing/pinching all hoses coming from stat housing were flowing warm water. Then ran 5 gallons of mix from a gas can with short hose and muffs. Never a problem. Last couple years I drained blocks making sure close to same amount water flows out of each side of block and pull the water hoses off any cooler and drain. Reconnect and pull stat and pour rv or antifreeze.

Multiple methods and I'm sure everyone has their own way but just saying what works for me. Northern MI.

If you do drain blocks make sure there there is no corrosion etc blocking drains. Paper clip or short piece of wire can come in handy.
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Old 09-19-2017, 11:53 AM
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Emergency method. Pull bottom hose from water pump. Drains heads, intake, top half of blick. Pull bottom hoses from exhausts. Drains manifolds and risers. Remove thermo housing. Reinstall water pump hose. Fill intake with green full strength antifreeze till it is full. Take hoses off raw water pump. Stick a shop vac on the hoses and suck them out.
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Old 09-19-2017, 11:55 AM
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So the beastie held up the summer?
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Old 09-19-2017, 12:22 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dereknkathy View Post
Emergency method. Pull bottom hose from water pump. Drains heads, intake, top half of blick. Pull bottom hoses from exhausts. Drains manifolds and risers. Remove thermo housing. Reinstall water pump hose. Fill intake with green full strength antifreeze till it is full. Take hoses off raw water pump. Stick a shop vac on the hoses and suck them out.
👍 Been there also. Good call on the exhaust manifolds. Completely forgot to mention that unfortunately....
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Old 09-19-2017, 02:06 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dereknkathy View Post
So the beastie held up the summer?

Emergency method. Pull bottom hose from water pump. Drains heads, intake, top half of blick. Pull bottom hoses from exhausts. Drains manifolds and risers. Remove thermo housing. Reinstall water pump hose. Fill intake with green full strength antifreeze till it is full. Take hoses off raw water pump. Stick a shop vac on the hoses and suck them out.

Yup, she's been running great all summer - used it a few times a week for a few hours at a time, pulling kids on tubes and cruising at wot. Running good but still not as fast as I'd like at 45mph at 4200 rpm, but that is with my 19P. Will look at a 17P next year.

I'll try that method. Only question is why would I remove the water pump hoses and use shop vac, after filling the intake with antifreeze by removing the thermo housing? Wouldn't it all by the antifreeze already? BTW - I assume 'water pump' and 'raw water pump' is the same unit.

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Old 09-19-2017, 09:04 PM
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spend $100 on a proper winterization setup.

-$60 sub pump
-$20 Rubbermaid container
-$20 pvc for exhaust pipes

make a simple anti freeze loop so you can continue to run the engine until it's warm ensuring the t stat is open. Once complete fog engine on antifreeze loop. Simple and easy
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Old 09-20-2017, 06:29 AM
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no, the water pump is on the front of the engine. the bottom hose drains the block pretty far. the raw water pump is hanging off the right side. pulling those hoses drains the oil and power steering coolers. and vacuuming them out is easier way to be sure the coolers are empty.
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Old 09-20-2017, 07:48 AM
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I just don't trust draining engines or even vacuuming. I vacuum will not pull water from a slight low spot, because if air suction can pass over the low spot, it won't pull all of the water with it. Now this little bit of water likely won't be enough to freeze a crack a block; however if more left over water migrates to that spot, it could do so. Remember, we often move the boat after it's winterized which could move left over water around to a low spot. Also, if something is damp, but not submerged in water, that's how corrosion (rust) gets started. SOME antifreezes contain rust inhibitors; so having the internal passages submerged/filled with (proper strength) antifreeze is better, IMHO. True, an empty block won't freeze; but it can rust, especially if the last water you ran through there was city water with a chlorine content; or perhaps with some salinity.
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