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Regarding the worsening Ethanol Fuel situation - a DIY solution

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Old 11-04-2011, 11:56 PM
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Default Regarding the worsening Ethanol Fuel situation - a DIY solution

In light of the proposed increase of ethanol in gasoline, I think this will be of great interest to all boat owners, and anyone who wants to guard their engine against these highly destructive modern fuel formulations.

While they were once common place from the early 1900's up to the late 50's, there aren't too many people (myself included) that remember the old Top Cylinder Lubricators that were used to apply a uniform vapor of Marvel Mystery Oil to the top end of the engine.


These haven't been made for over 50 years, but there is one place that has a sizable leftover stock of original Ampco Lubricators which were made in the 1950's.

I originally found out about these oilers by running across that ad while browsing through a 1950's issue of Popular Mechanics magazine. I did a search for more information, and discovered the current leftover NOS from the 50's.

The gentleman who owns the Ampco store has been unfailingly helpful and attentive to my orders, and has demonstrated the kind of exemplary customer service you wish every business would adopt.

I have ordered several for my vehicles and one of the larger 2-quart models for my Formula.

Installing a couple of these on your boat's engines will not only keep them from burning up valves and rings, but will measurably extend the life of any engine, ethanol or no.

Marvel Mystery Oil itself has some rather unique properties that set it apart from other oils or additives.

Ever wonder what it is about Marvel that allows it to free rusted bolts and seized pistons? The key is in the way it smells.

It is an ingredient that the Navy has known about since the turn of the century: Oil of Wintergreen, the same stuff used to give root beer its distinctive flavor.

Oil of Wintergreen is remarkable in its ability to penetrate metal and prevent corrosion.

Ever since I learned more about Marvel, I have used it almost exclusively as a general purpose lubricant and am just amazed at how well it works. It even performs admirably as a furniture polish.

Well worth considering.
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Old 11-05-2011, 06:56 AM
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Originally Posted by JP-8 View Post
In light of the proposed increase of ethanol in gasoline, I think this will be of great interest to all boat owners, and anyone who wants to guard their engine against these highly destructive modern fuel formulations.

While they were once common place from the early 1900's up to the late 50's, there aren't too many people (myself included) that remember the old Top Cylinder Lubricators that were used to apply a uniform vapor of Marvel Mystery Oil to the top end of the engine.


These haven't been made for over 50 years, but there is one place that has a sizable leftover stock of original Ampco Lubricators which were made in the 1950's.

I originally found out about these oilers by running across that ad while browsing through a 1950's issue of Popular Mechanics magazine. I did a search for more information, and discovered the current leftover NOS from the 50's.

The gentleman who owns the Ampco store has been unfailingly helpful and attentive to my orders, and has demonstrated the kind of exemplary customer service you wish every business would adopt.

I have ordered several for my vehicles and one of the larger 2-quart models for my Formula.

Installing a couple of these on your boat's engines will not only keep them from burning up valves and rings, but will measurably extend the life of any engine, ethanol or no.

Marvel Mystery Oil itself has some rather unique properties that set it apart from other oils or additives.

Ever wonder what it is about Marvel that allows it to free rusted bolts and seized pistons? The key is in the way it smells.

It is an ingredient that the Navy has known about since the turn of the century: Oil of Wintergreen, the same stuff used to give root beer its distinctive flavor.

Oil of Wintergreen is remarkable in its ability to penetrate metal and prevent corrosion.

Ever since I learned more about Marvel, I have used it almost exclusively as a general purpose lubricant and am just amazed at how well it works. It even performs admirably as a furniture polish.

Well worth considering.
can't you just put some in the gas tank so it mix's with gas and get's burned threw the motor ?

mike
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Old 11-05-2011, 12:18 PM
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Yes, you can. Marvel recommends 4 oz. per 10 gallons of gas or diesel. This is certainly good to do, as it is a fine fuel stabilizer, and will lubricate fuel pumps.

However, the oiler is superior in that it works off of manifold vacuum. The more load placed on the engine, the more vaporized oil gets introduced into the cylinders. It is precisely adjusted via a thumbscrew on the device.

This ability to variably meter the amount that gets used relative to engine load is what makes the oiler so effective.

Were you to add as much Marvel to the fuel tank as the oiler will inject at 5000 RPM, an overly rich mixture would result at lower RPM.

Last edited by JP-8; 11-05-2011 at 12:21 PM.
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Old 11-05-2011, 12:39 PM
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Originally Posted by JP-8 View Post
Yes, you can. Marvel recommends 4 oz. per 10 gallons of gas or diesel. This is certainly good to do, as it is a fine fuel stabilizer, and will lubricate fuel pumps.

However, the oiler is superior in that it works off of manifold vacuum. The more load placed on the engine, the more vaporized oil gets introduced into the cylinders. It is precisely adjusted via a thumbscrew on the device.

This ability to variably meter the amount that gets used relative to engine load is what makes the oiler so effective.

Were you to add as much Marvel to the fuel tank as the oiler will inject at 5000 RPM, an overly rich mixture would result at lower RPM.
How is this system installed? Does it inject into the carb itself.

Thanks
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Old 11-05-2011, 12:58 PM
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I am obviously not a chemist and not an expert in cylinder lubrication. I am not against using any additives in our fuels or oils that will benefit the reliability, durability or longevity of any engine. We should be careful here to look furthur and study furthur the real reasons behind the damage to marine engines and others now from the use of increased ethanol based fuels.
My limited knowledge and studies are now pointing to the facts that some of this damage and difficulities with using ethanol come from issues other than just cylinder lubrication, but instead can come from the chemical reactions that can occur in the combustion of ethanol laced fuels and how the chemical reactions can and do create new compounds and by-products that are also responsible for the issues and damages that are appearing in these engines. There probably is not any off the shelf product that is going to solve the real problem and issue here, don't put your hopes on a simple one stop easy fix! The real problem here is the fuel type, not the additives that might help offset some of its bad effects!
Lets not spend to much time and energy looking for a "quick simple" fix and instead lets try and help make sure that if ethanol is shown to cause significant problems and damage in our marine engines that we work towards making sure that it is not forced on us as a mandated fuel change and we suffer in the future from something we should have stopped!
What to you think? How should we halt this onslaught? Where do we go from here?
Think about it carefully, get informed and help stop what may be another "nail in the coffin of the boating industry!"
Just my two cents.

Best Regards,
Ray @ Raylar
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Old 11-05-2011, 01:22 PM
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well Ray, there is one quick simple fix. quit subsidizing the ethanol industry and quit putting it in the fuel and let the free market do it's thing. unfortunately there are too many corrupt and inept people making those decisions.
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Old 11-05-2011, 01:46 PM
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In the meantime, utilizing the "easy fix" methodology of mixing stabilizers such as Stabil, Startron, Boat Foam, Marvel etc. is our only option to at least slow down the affects of Ethanol. Also don't forget fogging and/or 2-stroking your fuel filters for winter lay up helps your injectors and fuel rails survive the Ethanol onslaught as well....Again philosophically the "easy fix" can't hurt when consistent.
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Old 11-05-2011, 01:49 PM
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Originally Posted by Mariah212Z View Post
How is this system installed? Does it inject into the carb itself.

Thanks

Yes, you can inject into the carburetor (I plan to do this on my Q-Jet), or you can install a spacer plate with nozzle under the carb.

[YOUTUBE]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wi-rMwUOraY&feature=player_embedded[/YOUTUBE]
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Old 11-05-2011, 02:08 PM
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Originally Posted by Raylar View Post
I am obviously not a chemist and not an expert in cylinder lubrication. I am not against using any additives in our fuels or oils that will benefit the reliability, durability or longevity of any engine. We should be careful here to look furthur and study furthur the real reasons behind the damage to marine engines and others now from the use of increased ethanol based fuels.
My limited knowledge and studies are now pointing to the facts that some of this damage and difficulities with using ethanol come from issues other than just cylinder lubrication, but instead can come from the chemical reactions that can occur in the combustion of ethanol laced fuels and how the chemical reactions can and do create new compounds and by-products that are also responsible for the issues and damages that are appearing in these engines. There probably is not any off the shelf product that is going to solve the real problem and issue here, don't put your hopes on a simple one stop easy fix! The real problem here is the fuel type, not the additives that might help offset some of its bad effects!
Lets not spend to much time and energy looking for a "quick simple" fix and instead lets try and help make sure that if ethanol is shown to cause significant problems and damage in our marine engines that we work towards making sure that it is not forced on us as a mandated fuel change and we suffer in the future from something we should have stopped!
What to you think? How should we halt this onslaught? Where do we go from here?
Think about it carefully, get informed and help stop what may be another "nail in the coffin of the boating industry!"
Just my two cents.

Best Regards,
Ray @ Raylar

Ray,

Certainly, the ultimate solution would be to put a stop to ethanol blending outright. And indeed, there is a definite chemical reaction that takes place during combustion of ethanol-laced fuels.

Until we can get ethanol out of our boat's fuel, things like these oilers can only help. I strongly advocate their use regardless of what fuel an engine uses because they will help reduce wear and improve operating characteristics of any engine.

I didn't have to spend much time or energy to arrive at this conclusion, or to find out about these oilers.

The owner of the Ampco store has written a comprehensive summary of just how useful these things are on virtually any engine.
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Old 11-05-2011, 02:39 PM
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Here's a interesting read from Business Week back in 2009

http://www.businessweek.com/lifestyl...514_058678.htm

Yes, the hydroscopic effects of ethanol laced fuel (water production) can be slowed and helped with certain additives and I think its prudent for any boater to use the good ones to help prevent the water damage and galvanic damage to fuel systems on boats if they are using ethanol laced fuels.
In the mean time though I think we have got to stop our mis-intentioned government agencies from destorying our marine engines and making boaters pay for their mistake and subsequent damage!

Best Regards,
Ray @ Raylar
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