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Why did they not get their boats out?

Old 11-04-2012, 03:32 AM
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Originally Posted by Jupiter Sunsation
well maybe not..........

In Florida after the double team hurricanes in 2004 many people got paid for storm damage. Screen enclosures were a big thing (covering the pool/patio) and people got 25-50K to replace them but the local screen companies were months or even years behind the workload. I know a company that had a 2 inch thick binder of pending jobs. Well people spent the "screen" money on other stuff and the guy's 2 inch binder turned to a few pages after 6-12 months. People decided to spend their insurance proceeds elsewhere.

In the NY/NJ case, winter is fast approaching and many have devasted homes and businesses (other places to spend boat proceeds). Some will figure the short season, the soon to be outrageous insurance costs (windstorm coverage will now carry a new meaning for many) and the lack of storage/dockage (many marinas are wrecked) has ended their desire to own a boat until Sandy becomes a faded memory.
Very good point

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Old 11-04-2012, 08:18 AM
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Whats even more sobering to realize is that Sandy was not a strong storm by any means,
one can only imagine what could have happened and be thankful it was not worse..
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Old 11-04-2012, 11:09 AM
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I pulled both of mine in time and brought them inland thank God, but cant put it back for a bit...my neighbors in the way.

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Old 11-04-2012, 11:10 AM
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Originally Posted by HTRDLNCN
Whats even more sobering to realize is that Sandy was not a strong storm by any means,
one can only imagine what could have happened and be thankful it was not worse..
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Good point, I grew up in NJ and my entire family still lives there. My cousin lost TWO boats... They dont even know where they are! Now I live in Florida and a category 1 isn't a huge storm in Florida... I hate to say it but Miami/Dade style code enforcement should be in effect for ALL coastal towns.

The storm surge was everything in Sandy. I cant even imagine if they actually had cat 2 or cat 3 level winds. It would have made Katrina look like a side show. Heck, it is already looking like Sandy was worse...
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Old 11-04-2012, 11:27 AM
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Don't let it being a Cat 1 fool ya. Even though Irean was not a labeled a cat 2 we had enough winds that it should have been and we saw nothing like this. Sandy was a perfect storm on the perfect time. The full moon tide took water levels to the edge from the start and then Sandy piled on top of that. Not to mention that a lot of the east coast is old. Old cities, old homes, big old trees, old regulations but I do agree that maybe this will kick us in our complicity a little. We have to remember that even a 100 year storm happens now and then. We have just been unlucky enough to have two of them in the last two years.
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Old 11-04-2012, 11:44 AM
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Damage is damage no matter what so I agree with you on that part,
howevermost the damage I have seen in the pcitures is from the water.
Just like in New Orleans most the damage was from levees breaking, if you look at pictures
after hurricane but before levess broke it was not bad at all. My point is if you Sandy had also had bad wind it could have been much worse. I know it wont help lessen what happened but as we reflect on it we can still be thankful it was not worse.
and of course plan to be better prepared for next time.
Like you said maybe it will be a wake up call and some good can come out of it that way.
This is what a 200mph hurricane (Andrew) does to a neighborhood:
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedi..._fema_2563.jpg

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Old 11-12-2012, 03:58 PM
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Originally Posted by Comanche3Six
Just finished chainsawing the tree away. Coaming damage. The old Cigs are tough!
Ed, while I hoped the damage would be "nothing" which is of course unrealistic...that is still fantastic that this is all of the damage to the Firefox!! Should be an easy fix and as we both know those 24s are built like little tanks.

As CIG20 said earlier, still the nicest and most desirable Firefox I know of...I too hope to have the opportunity to take over custodianship of it someday.

The fact you bought it new and have kept it in original mint condition all these years speaks volumes to me!!

Here is a reminder of happier days, I have faith you will have it back to like new in no time!!



All my best to everyone effected by this nasty storm!

Dave
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Old 11-12-2012, 05:08 PM
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Originally Posted by 78CIG24
Ed, while I hoped the damage would be "nothing" which is of course unrealistic...that is still fantastic that this is all of the damage to the Firefox!! Should be an easy fix and as we both know those 24s are built like little tanks.

As CIG20 said earlier, still the nicest and most desirable Firefox I know of...I too hope to have the opportunity to take over custodianship of it someday.

The fact you bought it new and have kept it in original mint condition all these years speaks volumes to me!!

Here is a reminder of happier days, I have faith you will have it back to like new in no time!!



All my best to everyone effected by this nasty storm!

Dave
Dave...Thank you for the kind words. The Professional that I use for fiberglass/kevlar work is getting his shop back in order(Hurricane damage) as we speak. Once that is accomplished he will repair the Cigarette Firefox back to factory standards. He has earned my complete confidence over the decades. That pic you posted is over 25 years old, Tempus fugit.
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Old 11-13-2012, 10:11 PM
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Originally Posted by GoFastScott
Well, I know down here in S Florida many people don't take the warnings seriously. I myself blew off too much preparation when they said Wilma would be coming across the state, sure I had a 24 pack of water and a couple bags of chips/pretzels etc figuring things might be bad but after several false calls previously I would be fine, everything would be pretty much normal the next day. Turns out we got our ass kicked, I had no power for 13 days, gas stations and grocery stores were closed down, it was the first time in my life I ever accepted a handout from our govt, but without the water and MRE's I don't know how I would have made it through. I take it MUCH more seriously now, and assemble a box full of emergency rations and water at the start of every hurricane season, along with tarps, tie downs, and whatever else I think I may need to get through after a storm. Human nature seems to be "it can't happen to me", but when reality bites you in the ass you start taking things more seriously for the next one. I guess its kinda like our boating experiences, who really has a "bailout" bag in case something happens to us offshore?
Don't forget that after this storm the temp went down to the high 30's - low 40's at night. Not much fun with no heat or hot water
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