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CDL requirements.

Old 10-28-2018, 01:00 PM
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Originally Posted by Got Freedom? View Post
I know a lot of people will disagree but the only solution I could find for legal interstate towing of more than 26,001lbs and/or a trailer in excess of 10,000lbs was to obtain a class A CDL license. Unless you register your trailer and truck with RV plates, but that's going to be a hard sell. The alternative is having your rig impounded, a big fine and potential arrest. Since you are "not for hire" you wouldn't need to acquire and display a DOT number on your truck, but you still need a drivers license and plates that covers the weight of your rig.

GF?
GF is 100% correct here. I did a ton of research when I bought my F650 on the same subject. It does not matter if you're using it for personal or commercial uses, if your GCVWR is 26,001lbs or more (doesn't matter what the ACTUAL weight is, just the rating) then you need a CDL. Most people with a 1 ton dually and a triple axle boat trailer are over 26k GCVWR. Now, that being said, I agree that the DOT officials are probably not looking to enforce these laws on boats, but they could if they wanted to and the fines would be steep.

The only loophole (and the loophole to most DOT regulations honestly) is if its an RV. They're exempt from every law it seems. An RV is any vehicle designed for temporary living (travel trailers/5th wheels count). I have heard some people argue their boat is set up for temporary living since it has a head, bed, sink, etc. But that would be up to the interpretation of the DOT official.
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Old 10-28-2018, 02:11 PM
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I agree with both of the last two replies however I will go back to the medical card that I mentioned earlier. We, farmers, are exempt from a CDL but we are still required to carry a medical card so my point is if you can argue your way out of not needing a CDL there is no way you can argue out of the medical.
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Old 10-28-2018, 02:43 PM
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having been there, done that, all I can add is this. it does not matter what the law says or how you interpret it, it matters what the guy that stops you decides to site you for and how willing you are to let them impound your rig while you go to court and fight it. there have been more than a few with rigs that are borderline or over that spent weeks fighting things in court so if you are a really long rig or oversized or heavy it is better to play safe than sorry. as for the claiming to be an rv, several racers tried that years back because they had a porta potty and a fridge in the truck box only to be impounded in the keys for a week because they forced every big boat thru the scales. I remember three or four rigs locked up there during the worlds and they had to find someone to move the boats while the trucks were impounded.
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Old 10-28-2018, 03:34 PM
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Originally Posted by Got Freedom? View Post
Getting a CDL is not difficult, there are plenty of practice tests online and the driving test isn't hard at all.

As of 1986 the CDL requirements are federal laws and determined by the DOT and apply to all states. The exact training program to obtain a CDL is determined by the state itself but the weight classifications are federal. Some states issue "modified" class licenses that are state-specific and may not allow you travel outside of the issuing state. In Illinois at least, a standard Class D drivers licenses has a maximum GVWR of 16,000lbs, as stated on the backside of the licenses. I think most states have similar ratings for a Class D license.

The DOT requirements for interstate travel while towing in excess of 10,000lbs or having a GVWR of more then 26,001lbs have absolutely nothing to do with being commercial or having a DOT number. The few exemptions are farm equipment, firefighting vehicles, military equipment and RVs.

GF?
You need to have class ? (I believe its C) if you tow a commercially trailer @ 10000# or more. Not needed if private. In addition if commercial @ 10000# to 26,000# you need a medical card, you are restricted to 120 miles as the crow flys 1 way, you must carry a log book, & you must post DOT #s. Any thing over 26000#s commercial is mandatory jail time!
This is whats needed commercially for sure. I spoke with a number of people in my field & are findings are the same. In addition I spoke with DOT certified officer with the same requirements as stated. In addition would you even be covered by insurance if out of compliance? Not sure on that but if I was towing privately over 26000#s I would check it out. Just my 2 cents..
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Old 10-28-2018, 05:24 PM
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Originally Posted by ToMorrow44 View Post
GF is 100% correct here. I did a ton of research when I bought my F650 on the same subject. It does not matter if you're using it for personal or commercial uses, if your GCVWR is 26,001lbs or more (doesn't matter what the ACTUAL weight is, just the rating) then you need a CDL. Most people with a 1 ton dually and a triple axle boat trailer are over 26k GCVWR. Now, that being said, I agree that the DOT officials are probably not looking to enforce these laws on boats, but they could if they wanted to and the fines would be steep.

The only loophole (and the loophole to most DOT regulations honestly) is if its an RV. They're exempt from every law it seems. An RV is any vehicle designed for temporary living (travel trailers/5th wheels count). I have heard some people argue their boat is set up for temporary living since it has a head, bed, sink, etc. But that would be up to the interpretation of the DOT official.
Originally Posted by drumerjb View Post
You need to have class ? (I believe its C) if you tow a commercially trailer @ 10000# or more. Not needed if private. In addition if commercial @ 10000# to 26,000# you need a medical card, you are restricted to 120 miles as the crow flys 1 way, you must carry a log book, & you must post DOT #s. Any thing over 26000#s commercial is mandatory jail time!
This is whats needed commercially for sure. I spoke with a number of people in my field & are findings are the same. In addition I spoke with DOT certified officer with the same requirements as stated. In addition would you even be covered by insurance if out of compliance? Not sure on that but if I was towing privately over 26000#s I would check it out. Just my 2 cents..
You will need a Class A license to tow a combination vehicle with a GCWR of more than 26,001lbs and/or a trailer with a GVWR of more than 10,000lbs. Doesn't matter if it actually weighs that much at the time you are stopped, it's the rating that matters.

GF?
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Old 10-28-2018, 06:03 PM
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I didn’t have a CDL but I need to have a medical card my commercial truck is registered over 10,000 lbs.
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Old 10-28-2018, 09:40 PM
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When I ask locally I get the same answer and no definitive conclusion. Does anyone have any literature on running the truck privately. The freightliner has a gvw of 19500. So what's the max trailer gvw allowed?
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Old 10-28-2018, 10:02 PM
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Jason.
As long as your tow vehicle is under 26K and your trailer is under 10K you don't need an A license. In reality you could be driving a Pete, Kenworth, Freightliner etc by it's lonesome and be good but as soon as you hook up to a trailer that is rated for over 10K then you need the A license. So lets say that you had a tractor with a small open car trailer like you would tow behind your PU, you wouldn't need an A license. If you ever notice a U-Haul 24' truck (gvw 26K) pulling a car trailer, the driver doesn't need the A license. That combo is legal in all 50 states.
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Old 10-28-2018, 11:41 PM
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There must be a way to get around the 10k trailer if it is recreational use. Any tri axle is over 10k.
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Old 10-28-2018, 11:45 PM
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It's crazy to think when you show up to a poker and and the majority of those rigs do not comply, me included.
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