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Jobs In The Offshore Industry???

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Old 04-03-2008, 08:53 PM
  #21
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I suggest starting in south Florida where it rains every hour in the summer, leave your wrenches in the sun and you can fry your morning eggs on them, find a place to test that is not a manattee zone, stay inside and sell bimmer parts.
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Old 04-04-2008, 07:15 AM
  #22
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If you get into repo work make sure you have the proper paperwork or stay 100 miles away from the boat
There was paperwork????????????
 
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Old 04-04-2008, 07:38 AM
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There was paperwork????????????
Isn't there a thread for this already? If you want to poke him, give him a call- I PM'ed his number to you. Let's focus on the kid.

Good advice so far. Depending on where you end up, you can find a satisfying and lucrative career in this biz. You have to decide where your talents lie before that's going to happen. Becoming a Merc certified tech is no different than becoming a Ford certified master tech. It takes alot of time, talent and effort. If you're not an exceptional mechanic at your present age, you likely won't become one. If you are, then that might be the career path for you. Rigging is all about incredible detail and a substantial amount of vision and artistry. You're making something from scratch and doing it many times without a blueprint. Again, you have to find out if you have the talent, not just the desire. Working for a manufacturer doing this type of work is a stepping stone, not a career. It will tell you if you have the skills to do more than assembling the same thing, the same way every time. If not, you have a 9-to-5 factory job, not an exciting career. You say you're in wholesale parts- maybe that's a good stepping stone. There are plenty of vendors out there selling the parts and accessories for all these boats. Frankly, that might be your best bet. Before you start making any real money on the hands-on side of the business, you'll need years of skill, experience and reputation, not to mention the $$ for a facility and equipment to do this work. The "business" side of the biz can generate a nice income and is a great way for you to move up fast.

Whatever you decide, good luck.
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Old 04-04-2008, 10:17 AM
  #24
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Call Terry at Nortech. I hear he's ready to retire.
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Old 04-04-2008, 02:06 PM
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Originally Posted by monstaaa View Post
i myself went to school for accounting.
i presently own a small family inherited buisness. collision/ auto repair, and i repeat small..
i have 3 children.
i went from top notch place to top notch place until i opened my own performance shop which lasted almost 4 years until i decided any buisness is not as important as my family.
i then sat home for a year to process a direction i wanted to take for the long run. soon there after i decided to join a truly honorable and wonderful orginazation in which i presently work for.
i my self could not be happier. i love my family, i love my job, i love my life.
i get up every day knowing that i am going to enjoy my work smelling fuel , listening to that rapture of big block engines and the sweet smell of the salt air with the wind in my face on bay tests. and when i get home enjoy my time with the fam because i took the time to find the right job with the right people so i canafford the lifestyle i want.

i dont regret the time hesitating and analizing what truly made me happy.

listen to your heart and let your mind sort out the details.

best of luck to you,,,,

EXACTALLY!! I'm not trying to make my way up to the top or try to compete with these big heavy hitters out there, I just want to start with a foot in the door, just being around this enviroment, and knowing every morning when i get to work I am going to giggle like a kid, smile, and be happy to be there doing what it takes.
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Old 04-04-2008, 02:26 PM
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Originally Posted by Chris Sunkin View Post
Isn't there a thread for this already? If you want to poke him, give him a call- I PM'ed his number to you. Let's focus on the kid.

Good advice so far. Depending on where you end up, you can find a satisfying and lucrative career in this biz. You have to decide where your talents lie before that's going to happen. Becoming a Merc certified tech is no different than becoming a Ford certified master tech. It takes alot of time, talent and effort. If you're not an exceptional mechanic at your present age, you likely won't become one. If you are, then that might be the career path for you. Rigging is all about incredible detail and a substantial amount of vision and artistry. You're making something from scratch and doing it many times without a blueprint. Again, you have to find out if you have the talent, not just the desire. Working for a manufacturer doing this type of work is a stepping stone, not a career. It will tell you if you have the skills to do more than assembling the same thing, the same way every time. If not, you have a 9-to-5 factory job, not an exciting career. You say you're in wholesale parts- maybe that's a good stepping stone. There are plenty of vendors out there selling the parts and accessories for all these boats. Frankly, that might be your best bet. Before you start making any real money on the hands-on side of the business, you'll need years of skill, experience and reputation, not to mention the $$ for a facility and equipment to do this work. The "business" side of the biz can generate a nice income and is a great way for you to move up fast.

Whatever you decide, good luck.
that is a great point, I feel I have enough skills and the ability to learn as quickly as the best. Frankly, the wholesale parts biz for me is more behind a desk, with a nextel, or on the phone with customers trying to please them, discount things that during the transaction something was a bit off, its just a really big headache, and the customers i deal with at BMW just add to that headache. not to mention my delivery drivers who are out sourced and hardly speak english....then minimum wage parts pullers who dont even have a common sense about car parts. they dont know the difference between a shock or a strut... I was in the boat biz for a while and LOVED it, this wholesale biz over the last 5 years has just been digging at me and not a good way...
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Old 04-04-2008, 05:19 PM
  #27
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I spent almost ten years working whatever job would pay the most money so that I could build engines and mess around with boats. I worked in many different fields of the marine and mechanical industry and made a lot more money then I am now, but it was a compromise. Three years ago at 29 I went on my own because all I wanted to do was build engines even though there's no market for it here. Right now I'm looking at a half dozen motors on stands, a 25' Donzi, and a 9 second street car in my shop. I live upstairs, I only have enough money to pay my bills and keep the heat on, and have never been happier. Gotta follow your heart..
Alex
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Old 04-04-2008, 05:41 PM
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I spent almost ten years working whatever job would pay the most money so that I could build engines and mess around with boats. I worked in many different fields of the marine and mechanical industry and made a lot more money then I am now, but it was a compromise. Three years ago at 29 I went on my own because all I wanted to do was build engines even though there's no market for it here. Right now I'm looking at a half dozen motors on stands, a 25' Donzi, and a 9 second street car in my shop. I live upstairs, I only have enough money to pay my bills and keep the heat on, and have never been happier. Gotta follow your heart..
Alex

What is wrong is a guy who does this with a wife and kids. If you want to be a circus performer, I'm all for it, as long as it's just you. These people who decide to "find themselves" at 30 or so with kids at home - I don't respect that at all. You take on the responsibilities of a family, your first and foremost responsiblity is to provide for them. Career happiness is WAY down the list.
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Old 04-04-2008, 05:56 PM
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I hear that. I can barely take care of a dog!
Zimm did say he was single though, and if you're gonna try different chit out you might as well do it before you start to look back on life with regrets. Every year goes by a little quicker..
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Old 04-05-2008, 08:27 AM
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Every year goes by a little quicker..
Amen.
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