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Shore Power wiring question

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Old 03-26-2010, 06:18 PM
  #11
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[QUOTE=C_Spray;3075618]I think you mean yellow for 12VDC negative. That eliminates the black/black confusion.

You are correct. Thanks for the correction.
I edited my post for saftey reasons.

Not sure where I came up with the red wire. Brain fart
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Old 03-26-2010, 08:23 PM
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Originally Posted by BDiggity View Post
Thanks for bringing this up because i am about to put in my new panels. Originally the boat only had ac (one recept) when on shore. I added a Xantrex charger/inverter. My shore power now runs to the Xantrex. Then from there it will run to my Blue Sea 1214. So according to the Blue Sea doc, i think this is how it should be wired. What confuses me is how the neutral & grounds from the loads are to be connected.

I've done a little more research since I posted this and it seems that the correct way to hook up a shore power ground is the green ground wire on the AC side needs to be connected to the a ground or ground bus on the DC side. From what I am told, you should run a wire from the grounding bus on your AC panel to the DC ground bus or negative batery terminal.
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Old 03-27-2010, 07:39 AM
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Originally Posted by neva satisfied View Post
I've done a little more research since I posted this and it seems that the correct way to hook up a shore power ground is the green ground wire on the AC side needs to be connected to the a ground or ground bus on the DC side. From what I am told, you should run a wire from the grounding bus on your AC panel to the DC ground bus or negative batery terminal.
That is what I've always known.

All the AC systems and bonding systems I've worked on over the years are done this way... It serves multiple purposes a few examples are; 1. alternate ground, 2. galvanic corrosion due to reversed polarity. 3. old wires from old docks laying in the water causing stray currents .

Green is the universal ABYC wire color for a bonding system.
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Old 03-27-2010, 09:14 AM
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I am by no means an electrician, and maybe I'm wrong but doesn't connecting the two systems in this manner introduce stray current to the prop shaft in turn causing issues?
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Old 03-28-2010, 03:07 PM
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Electrocution is less likely in saltwater, but the current field can be enough to paralyze muscles and cause a swimmer to drown.
Can you explain this? I have been around batteries that are wet from fresh water with no effect, but tried jumping a jetski in the ocean and had the holy chit shocked out of me...
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Old 03-28-2010, 06:44 PM
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Can you explain this? I have been around batteries that are wet from fresh water with no effect, but tried jumping a jetski in the ocean and had the holy chit shocked out of me...
The correct wiring for the grounding on a boat is a ground buss or single point where you tie your AC green ground and a least one negative black connection at a common point. The green AC ground needs to tie in all green screws on your 120-Volt receptacles, the ground shell screw on your shore power hook-up and the case on your charger or inverter. NEVER EVER CONNECT THIS WIRE WITH THE AC NEUTRAL. SEVERE ELECTROCUTION HAZARDS CAN EXIST. Always use GFCI outlets.

Keep in mind, pure water is an insulator, it's the elements that exist in water that are conductive. Salt Water, lake water or river water it doesn't matter. If there is iron there is a pathway for current. It only takes 4 mili-amps to kill.
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Old 03-28-2010, 09:26 PM
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use a galvonic isolator!!!!
Someone life is not worth leaving it out.
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Old 03-28-2010, 11:02 PM
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use a galvonic isolator!!!!
Someone life is not worth leaving it out.
A properly grounded system will prevent electric shock. If your shore power is connected properly and your ground buss system is terminated with low resistance ( tight connections & star tapology wiring connections) your boat will also be protected from ill wired shore power or accidental AC contact with water. Galvonic isolators are strickly put in line in the main green AC ground wire to the buss system to prevent low current transfers between the shore power ground system and the boat/water ground which can cause fast setting corrosion on the metal parts exposed in the water. All different grounds have a difference in potential (voltage) hence current flow through a complete path shore power ground through boat to the water.

I would install the isolators for corrosion protection. But again consult the manufacturer for correct installation. You may need two since AC current flows in both directions. Depends on charger or inverter systems install.
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Old 03-28-2010, 11:19 PM
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Thanks for better understanding
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Old 03-29-2010, 06:55 AM
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Now I'm really confused. Is the galvanic isolator's purpose to protect from corrosion that might be caused from other boats or shore power cords hanging in the water at a marina or to protect from corosion from your own boat "if that is even possible"? Will hooking up the green AC ground to the DC negative on the boat provide an opportunity to introduce corrosion to your boat? This is turning out to be more complicated than I thought.
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