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Oil spill in the gulf of Mexico

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Old 05-06-2010, 03:09 PM
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I thought they were just TALKING about an agreement with the Cuban govt. Are they actually drilling now? Wouldn't this have made headlines? I suppose I could have missed it.
Excerpt from USnews and World Communist Mag



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ArticlePhoto (1)Comments (18)Cuba Plans New Offshore Drilling in Search for Big Oil Finds in the Gulf of Mexico
By Thomas Omestad
Posted February 3, 2009
HAVANA—Cuban officials say that exploratory drilling to assess the potential for oil reserves in the Gulf of Mexico is likely to resume in the second quarter of this year, a sign that lower world oil prices have not derailed efforts by the Cuban government and its foreign corporate partners to keep moving toward offshore oil production.



A worker walks at an oil rig in Havana.Cuba believes it has major oil reserves in its waters. But the prospect of exploratory drilling—followed by likely future commercial drilling—in the Florida Straits has fired controversy in the United States, with the expectation that someday, foreign oil firms could be drilling as close as about 50 miles from parts of Florida.

The exploratory drilling will take place about 20 miles north of Havana and will be conducted by a consortium led by the Spanish oil firm Repsol, working with India's state-run Oil & Natural Gas Co. and Norway's StatoilHydro. Other exploratory drilling in the portion of the Gulf under Cuba's economic control is anticipated in 2010 and 2011.

"Cuba has high potential from an exploratory point of view," said Rafael Tenreyro Perez, exploration manager for Cubapetroleo (Cupet), the Cuban state oil company, in an interview. Seismic tests suggesting possible oil deposits over the past two years in Gulf waters were "very encouraging," he said.

Other firms that have, to varying degrees, partnered with the Cuban oil company in the hunt for oil either on or offshore hail from Venezuela, Malaysia, Vietnam, China, Canada, and Brazil. U.S. companies are barred from participating under regulations flowing from the 48-year-old American embargo of Cuba's economy. That widely criticized policy was intended to pressure Cuba's communist government to move toward democracy, but other countries oppose the U.S. isolation strategy toward Cuba and do business anyway.

Foreign firms have signed exploration and production agreements for 21 of the 59 blocks Cuba has created for its Gulf waters, where the biggest oil finds are believed to be located. An additional 23 blocks are said to be the subject of discussions with foreign companies.

Cupet has estimated that there are 20 billion barrels of recoverable offshore oil in Cuban waters. If that bears out, Cuba, with 11 million people, would have reserves that come into the same range as those of the United States.

The U.S. Geological Survey, though, has issued more conservative estimates: under 5 billion barrels in Cuba's offshore fields. Furthermore, most of the oil is believed to lie under deep water, where extraction is difficult and expensive.

Some see the advent of Cuban offshore oil drilling as raising the costs of maintaining the embargo policy, with other countries taking a piece of the Cuban action that might otherwise fall to some American firms. Some Capitol Hill lawmakers have urged that an exception be made in the embargo to permit energy cooperation. Overall Cuba policy is now under review by the Obama administration.

Others are worried that a future oil spill, given Gulf currents, could spoil Florida beaches and shore areas. Tenreyro says that any drilling operations will follow "the highest" international environmental standards.

Some Cuba watchers argue that environmental coordination with Cuba ought to be one of the early results of any policy changes developed by the Obama administration.

Gosh, I love cut and paste

I do have to make a concession, in the case of the well north of Havana it is NOT being done by China, but by Spain, India, and Norway.

When they have spills, will they give a shi t?
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Old 05-06-2010, 03:23 PM
  #152
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You may have heard the news in the last two days about the Deepwater Horizon drilling rig which caught fire, burned for two days, then
sank in 5,000 ft of water in the Gulf of Mexico. There are still 11 men missing, and they are not expected to be found.
The rig belongs to Transocean, the world’s biggest offshore drilling contractor. The rig was originally contracted through the year 2013 to
BP and was working on BP’s Macondo exploration well when the fire broke out. The rig costs about $500,000 per day to contract. The full
drilling spread, with helicopters and support vessels and other services, will cost closer to $1,000,000 per day to operate in the course of
drilling for oil and gas. The rig cost about $350,000,000 to build in 2001 and would cost at least double that to replace today.
The rig represents the cutting edge of drilling technology. It is a floating rig, capable of working in up to 10,000 ft water depth. The rig is
not moored; It does not use anchors because it would be too costly and too heavy to suspend this mooring load from the floating
structure. Rather, a triply-redundant computer system uses satellite positioning to control powerful thrusters that keep the rig on station
within a few feet of its intended location, at all times. This is called Dynamic Positioning.
The rig had apparently just finished cementing steel casing in place at depths exceeding 18,000 ft. The next operation was to suspend the
well so that the rig could move to its next drilling location, the idea being that a rig would return to this well later in order to complete the
work necessary to bring the well into production.
It is thought that somehow formation fluids – oil /gas – got into the wellbore and were undetected until it was too late to take action. With a
floating drilling rig setup, because it moves with the waves, currents, and winds, all of the main pressure control equipment sits on the
seabed – the uppermost unmoving point in the well. This pressure control equipment – the Blowout Preventers, or ‘BOP’s” as they’re
called, are controlled with redundant systems from the rig. In the event of a serious emergency, there are multiple Panic Buttons to hit,
and even fail-safe Deadman systems that should be automatically engaged when something of this proportion breaks out. None of them
were aparently activated, suggesting that the blowout was especially swift to escalate at the surface. The flames were visible up to about
35 miles away. Not the glow – the flames. They were 200 – 300 ft high.
All of this will be investigated and it will be some months before all of the particulars are known. For now, it is enough to say that this
marvel of modern technology, which had been operating with an excellent safety record, has burned up and sunk taking souls with it.
The well still is apparently flowing oil, which is appearing at the surface as a slick. They have been working with remotely operated
vehicles, or ROV’s which are essentially tethered miniature submarines with manipulator arms and other equipment that can perform work
underwater while the operator sits on a vessel. These are what were used to explore the Titanic, among other things. Every floating rig
has one on board and they are in constant use. In this case, they are deploying ROV’s from dedicated service vessels. They have been
trying to close the well in using a specialized port on the BOP’s and a pumping arrangement on their ROV’s. They have been unsuccessful
so far. Specialized pollution control vessels have been scrambled to start working the spill, skimming the oil up.
In the coming weeks they will move in at least one other rig to drill a fresh well that will intersect the blowing one at its pay zone. They will
use technology that is capable of drilling from a floating rig, over 3 miles deep to an exact specific point in the earth – with a target radius
of just a few feet plus or minus. Once they intersect their target, a heavy fluid will be pumped that exceeds the formation’s pressure, thus
causing the flow to cease and rendering the well safe at last. It will take at least a couple of months to get this done, bringing all available
technology to bear. It will be an ecological disaster if the well flows all of the while; Optimistically, it could bridge off downhole.
It’s a sad day when something like this happens to any rig, but even more so when it happens to something on the cutting edge of our
capabilities. The photos that follow show the progression of events over the 36 hours from catching fire to sinking.
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Old 05-06-2010, 03:29 PM
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Gosh, I love cut and paste
me, too. thanks for the info.
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Old 05-06-2010, 03:37 PM
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I have no idea why a completely public document like this http://www.usgs.gov/newsroom/article.asp?ID=1911, was not used as a reference point. At any rate, a simple slip of a decimal point or two.

I do remember those emails about the Bakken oil though. Some even went so far as to reference sites that totally refuted their headlines.
" the next 30 days the USGS (U.S. Geological Survey) will release a new report giving an accurate resource assessment of the Bakken Oil Formation that covers North Dakota and portions of South Dakota and Montana. With new horizontal drilling technology it is believed that from 175 to 500 billion barrels of'
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Old 05-06-2010, 03:58 PM
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Here is another chart:


http://www.investors.com/NewsAndAnal...aspx?id=511487
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Old 05-06-2010, 04:07 PM
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The article in that link is from Feb 13, 2008.

I hope it's true, just wondering why it wasn't included in the wiki stuff.
Jay, I live in Western Colorado. Refutably the richest reserves of oil shale in the world are in this, and surrounding areas. In the 1970s Exxon was heavily vested in oil shale exploration\refining. When the cost of oil from the Middle East "tanked", the exploration and refining was no longer viable. Too costly. The reserves have been estimated in the 2 TRILLION barrel range.

There has been a very aggressive movement as of late in regards to new refining processes and forecast development of infrastructure that would allow high volumes of oil shale to be produced. This is not something you will hear about on wiki. Very few are privy to the oil companies future endeavors. The past few years increase in oil prices, along with the market being so volatile, have ignited the interest of the oil executives and their stock holders.

The next few years will be interesting to say the least.

Sam
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Old 05-06-2010, 04:14 PM
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I read that Steve, way back when. I also provided a link to the actual USGS survey that they mentioned. There were earlier estimates from a now deceased scientist that was working with the USGS. They were proven to be a tad optimistic. The link was a direct response to what you had linked.

There are also estimates out there that reference oil equivalents, which do not translate into barrels of oil, but rather are directed towards energy output. Proven reserves remain the only quantifiable product. New technology has allowed Canada to reduce the cost of sand oil extraction, but it's still a little pricey. The sweet spots for global growth and sustainability of economies remains in the $70 to $100 bbl range.
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Old 05-06-2010, 05:34 PM
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I read that Steve, way back when. I also provided a link to the actual USGS survey that they mentioned. There were earlier estimates from a now deceased scientist that was working with the USGS. They were proven to be a tad optimistic. The link was a direct response to what you had linked.

There are also estimates out there that reference oil equivalents, which do not translate into barrels of oil, but rather are directed towards energy output. Proven reserves remain the only quantifiable product. New technology has allowed Canada to reduce the cost of sand oil extraction, but it's still a little pricey. The sweet spots for global growth and sustainability of economies remains in the $70 to $100 bbl range.
USGS,is a gov't bureaucracy ,I would trust the Oil companies who know a lot more about what is down there.
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Old 05-06-2010, 05:42 PM
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It's in shale, the dirtiest oil to extract and refine. I hope our shale is never worked because that oil is in the most beautiful, fragile, pristine wilderness left in this country.

US ranks 11th in proven reserves;

http://www.infoplease.com/ipa/A0872964.html
Cat look up Shells in-situ process before you condemn something in that manner and BTW we are #1 in the world .
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Old 05-06-2010, 06:16 PM
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Jay, I live in Western Colorado. Refutably the richest reserves of oil shale in the world are in this, and surrounding areas. In the 1970s Exxon was heavily vested in oil shale exploration\refining. When the cost of oil from the Middle East "tanked", the exploration and refining was no longer viable. Too costly. The reserves have been estimated in the 2 TRILLION barrel range.

There has been a very aggressive movement as of late in regards to new refining processes and forecast development of infrastructure that would allow high volumes of oil shale to be produced. This is not something you will hear about on wiki. Very few are privy to the oil companies future endeavors. The past few years increase in oil prices, along with the market being so volatile, have ignited the interest of the oil executives and their stock holders.

The next few years will be interesting to say the least.

Sam
exxon sign of the double cross comes to mind right off while reading this post. I was there for black sunday.. remember all the empty houses on battlement mesa.. yep an old buddy of mine said a lot of fortunes have been lost trying to get that oil. being in aviation I felt the sting a bit after the rest. you should see what that looks like from the air.. just my 2cents.. no dog in any fight
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