Go Back  Offshoreonly.com > General Discussion > General Boating Discussion
Start to Finish: Building Our 50' Skater >

Start to Finish: Building Our 50' Skater

Notices

Start to Finish: Building Our 50' Skater

Old 03-13-2016, 09:07 AM
  #101  
LV
Gold Member
Gold Member
 
LV's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Tulsa, OK
Posts: 1,039
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Default

How are you designing air intakes with regards to sea water in the event you start taking on water with a breach or big wave, could you add a snorkel of some kind to help maintain with a lot of water in bildge? Also wondered if compartments could be filled with foam, like bass boat technology if it did try to sink it would still be somewhat buoyant and increase survival percentages.
LV is offline  
Old 03-13-2016, 09:09 AM
  #102  
Registered
 
1 MAIDEN AMERICA's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Renton, Wa
Posts: 1,023
Likes: 0
Received 7 Likes on 6 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by Bigyellowcat View Post
I have a machine shop so we designed and machined a lot of parts for the boat. Here are the trim pieces and covers for the cockpit drains. Most of the time we will have the covers on unless its going to be rough water or raining to make sure nothing goes out the back if you drop something like a phone.

[ATTACH=CONFIG]552235[/ATTACH][ATTACH=CONFIG]552236[/ATTACH]
How about a hinged, spring loaded, normally open, door that can be shut and secured quickly with a 1/4 turn latch. No small parts, no tools needed, self storing. Opening these while tired, cold, submerged in cold water, at night would be tough.
Mechanically operated is simple, light and durable but if you added an electric actuator you could open them with a switch. Or maybe a dash mounted cable.
Stopping to open them takes time. Getting back on plane can be tougher in big waves, taking more time.
1 MAIDEN AMERICA is offline  
Old 03-13-2016, 09:21 AM
  #103  
Registered
 
BigSilverCat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Joplin, Mo
Posts: 2,627
Likes: 0
Received 11 Likes on 6 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by Double Rigged View Post
Tyson,
We have worked on many border patrol boats and I know the cockpit on some are larger but my question is that in the event you stuff a wave and such their boats had about 3 times the size of drains to let the water out. I assume those drains go out the sides.
When we saw the size of drains I was amazed at how many and how big they were. They had actually done calculations on the flow rate so that it would drain fast enough.
Just curious.
I have been in a boat that does not have a wrap around windshield and one that does while stuffing them through waves. The Skater with the wrap around windshield barely got wet in the cockpit, the deck having a slight concave to the outside lets a lot of the water just run off the side or go down the deck past the side of the windshield. The water that comes straight down the middle of the deck hits the windshield which has a slight angle to the side and pushes that water up and over the cockpit or to the side. The boat that did not have the wrap around windshield was filling up where we were having to bail it out. I knew it was getting bad when my camera bag was floating past me in the cockpit.

Bigger is always better in a drain size to empty something but we had to compromise with structural strength. Cutting at the bottom of the bulkhead takes away the I-beam strength of it so we did not want to cut it any bigger. We were going to have drains out the side where the strength would not be a problem but decided the boat rocking side to side would let water come in.

We technically made the cockpit where you could fill it up and the water would just run over the back when it fills up. The main reason for the drains was for water not to build up over hours of time from getting small amounts of water in from rain or taking some waves over the front.
BigSilverCat is offline  
Old 03-13-2016, 09:25 AM
  #104  
Registered
 
1 MAIDEN AMERICA's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Renton, Wa
Posts: 1,023
Likes: 0
Received 7 Likes on 6 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by Bigyellowcat View Post
Yes, The cockpit will have no holes in it where you could fill it up like a bathtub except for the two holes you see in the pic that run down the tunnel and out the back. If we are taking waves over the front or we are out there in a major rain storm and the cockpit starts filling up we do not want to have to stop and bail the water out (we have done this in Freedom on the way to the Bahamas in 12 footers). We did not want holes down into the bilge like most boats have. we may be 1500 miles from shore in waves like that for hours straight and If the bilge pumps quit working you could sink the boat. The holes are each half of a 6" pipe to be able to get the biggest part of the opening as low as possible. We did the math awhile back on how much unrestricted flow they will handle and it was a lot, I don't remember the time but it will drain the cockpit from half full really quick.

[ATTACH=CONFIG]552230[/ATTACH][ATTACH=CONFIG]552231[/ATTACH][ATTACH=CONFIG]552232[/ATTACH][ATTACH=CONFIG]552233[/ATTACH][ATTACH=CONFIG]552234[/ATTACH]
Now that we know where the toilet goes, I'd recommend a cover. Nothing worse than wet TP.
1 MAIDEN AMERICA is offline  
Old 03-13-2016, 09:35 AM
  #105  
Registered
 
BigSilverCat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Joplin, Mo
Posts: 2,627
Likes: 0
Received 11 Likes on 6 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by LV View Post
How are you designing air intakes with regards to sea water in the event you start taking on water with a breach or big wave, could you add a snorkel of some kind to help maintain with a lot of water in bildge? Also wondered if compartments could be filled with foam, like bass boat technology if it did try to sink it would still be somewhat buoyant and increase survival percentages.
Yes we basically have a snorkel for the air in and out, I will post the pictures of it tonight and explain it.

Flotation: We have tested pieces from the same layup as the boat and the bare hull will actually float itself. The balsa core adds enough flotation to overcome the fiberglass so we only need enough flotation to overcome the weight of the rigging and supplies. The boat will have more weight in the back so we have added a lot of flotation in the rear to try to make the boat float level if you knocked big holes in it. The bussle is really thick and tunnel extension/steps are sealed for flotation. You will see big boxes in the engine compartment that are full of foam for flotation, and once all the rigging is done we will be adding pockets of flotation where ever there is room. We are also having a salvage flotation bag made that will go in the tunnel and have a taper up to the front with straps to hook to the bow eye and tow eye on back to hold it in place and we should be able to keep driving forward slowly with it in there in emergency. We have a scuba tank onboard to be able to fill it if we loose power to our compressor.
BigSilverCat is offline  
Old 03-13-2016, 09:36 AM
  #106  
Registered
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: rock Island wa
Posts: 1,964
Likes: 0
Received 1 Like on 1 Post
Default

Lol 1 maiden, I asked the same thing on pg 8.
buck35 is offline  
Old 03-13-2016, 09:48 AM
  #107  
Registered
 
1 MAIDEN AMERICA's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Renton, Wa
Posts: 1,023
Likes: 0
Received 7 Likes on 6 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by Bigyellowcat View Post
To put a flapper and mechanism in the tube would have taken up space for water flow and not been guaranteed watertight.
We had originally built a slide gate for it but wanted to make sure it was completely water tight, it was heavier and the mechanism could fail. We will also have a rubber flapper in the back. We made a cover with little holes in it too and will have a spare sealed cover incase we loose one. But most of the time the solid cover will be on it, and we will take it off only to do long distance runs.

:::Anyone that reads this thread:::

Don't be afraid to ask questions or make suggestions. Anytime someone is doing something that is risking there lives there's no stupid question or suggestion to make it better/safer.

We have spent three years thinking about everything we could to make this boat the best/safest boat we could build for doing long distance endurance runs. We have consulted with everybody from old time offshore powerboat racers, sailboat racers, meteorologist, wilderness survival guides, sports medicine doctors, nutritionists, mechanical engineers and janitors. But nobody has done everything or been in every situation, so we will gladly accept any suggestions.

Thank you for any input,
Tyson Garvin.
Plan around a full moon so that you get some light at night.
FLIR for night time.
Check shipping schedules so that in the event you get stuck somebody will be close by. http://www.marinetraffic.com/en/ If AIS equipped you'll know who's where, when. Maybe run intercept courses.
A straight line is not the shortest path around the globe.

To attempt this, you probably know/thought of all of this but just in case.
Good luck
1 MAIDEN AMERICA is offline  
Old 03-13-2016, 09:52 AM
  #108  
Registered
 
BigSilverCat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Joplin, Mo
Posts: 2,627
Likes: 0
Received 11 Likes on 6 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by Double Rigged View Post
Also have you guys talked to SeaStar who makes the Optimus Joystick steering for outboards. They as well as mercury use liquid tie-bars since motors move different directions.
They basically use to independent hydraulic systems one on each motor and use feedback sensors to and a fly by wire helm.
Works very well and the control system allows you to configure lock to lock ratios and it can be set up to change automatically as speed increases to be less sensitive.

May be something they would want to sponsor on a cool project like this.
I helped develop and test the mercury system, After I started testing it I made them change it to have the less sensitive steering as speed increases.

The difference with the arneson vs a gimbal is it does not have a port to starboard pivot point to use a sensor to tell if there straight.

I would rather not have the electronic steering incase there is a problem. We had that on Chris's boat on the Bermuda challenge and had problems with it that stopped up in the middle of the night 600 miles from shore in a storm. I want the boat to be as mechanical as possible. That is why for my steering indicators I will have the electronic sensors to tell if there straight but will also have the mechanical indicators as backup. My transmissions are electronic shift but I have ports to mechanically lock them in if the solenoids fail. If I was going across the ocean and had the option of a carburetor or the highest tech fuel injection you could get I would choose carburetor because it will work and if it has a problem you can fix it.
BigSilverCat is offline  
Old 03-13-2016, 10:02 AM
  #109  
Registered
 
BigSilverCat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Joplin, Mo
Posts: 2,627
Likes: 0
Received 11 Likes on 6 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by 1 MAIDEN AMERICA View Post
Plan around a full moon so that you get some light at night.
FLIR for night time.
Check shipping schedules so that in the event you get stuck somebody will be close by. http://www.marinetraffic.com/en/ If AIS equipped you'll know who's where, when. Maybe run intercept courses.
A straight line is not the shortest path around the globe.

To attempt this, you probably know/thought of all of this but just in case.
Good luck
We have two ais on separate systems, we have flir and a big led light bar across the front of the tunnel.
On the Bermuda challenge one thing that made it reasonably safe is we were on a commercial traffic route. we passed a few container ships a few cruise ships. About 300 miles from shore we were passing a cruise ship and he kept coming over the radio telling us were going the wrong way. That there is no way we would make it all the way to Bermuda in a speed boat.

Then we passed one at night 600 miles from shore. Can you imagine his radar operator seeing something coming at them running 70 mph that far from shore? He had to be scratching his head.
BigSilverCat is offline  
Old 03-13-2016, 10:07 AM
  #110  
Registered
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Midwest, LOTO, Miami Beach
Posts: 975
Likes: 0
Received 3 Likes on 2 Posts
Default

How common are encounters with floating shipping containers that have fallen off ships?

That would worry me more than well lit up ships.

What about all the floating islands of trash I've read about?
Orthobam is offline  

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.